Orthodontist in Wilkins, SC

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A smile is such a simple thing, but it can hold so much power. Smiling is universally considered to be a way that humans display joy. Smiles communicate to others how we’re feeling and are often the best way to break the ice when meeting a new person. A good-natured smile can work wonders, but if you’re like most folks, your smile may not be perfect. Every day, we hear stories from people who feel embarrassed, ashamed, or even scared to flash their smile. In fact, 75% of prospective orthodontic patients could benefit from straighter teeth. Thankfully, Winning Orthodontic Smiles offers affordable orthodontic solutions that give our patients a healthier mouth, more self-esteem, and more confidence.

At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, your smile is our passion. Our orthodontists and hygienists are dedicated to providing you with the best orthodontic care possible in a stress-free, comfortable setting. We know what a difference a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to giving our clients a winning smile they love.

Having served the Lowcountry for more than 30 years, we know that no two patients have the exact orthodontic needs. That’s why we offer a variety of treatment options to correct each patient’s unique concerns, along with payment plans that make braces affordable for every family. You can rest easy knowing that our team specializes in the latest innovations in the field of orthodontics. This allows us to treat our patients in the most efficient, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing ways possible.

A few of our orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina include:
  • Invisalign®
  • Invisalign® Teen
  • Clear Braces
  • Traditional Braces
  • Early Treatment
  • Adult Treatment

If you’re looking for an orthodontist in Wilkins, SC, who is professional, trustworthy, and compassionate, look no further than Winning Orthodontic Smiles. Your pathway to a beautiful smile starts by selecting the orthodontic treatment option best suited for your needs.

Service Area

Invisalign Treatment

Invisalign® Treatment in Wilkins, SC

Over the last few years, Invisalign® has become one of the most popular and effective orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina. For those looking for a convenient, comfortable, discreet way to realign their teeth, Invisalign® should be on your shortlist.

What Is Invisalign®?

Invisalign® is a treatment used by orthodontists in Wilkins that straightens patients’ teeth without traditional braces. Invisalign® works using a succession of custom trays that cover your teeth, which gently pull them into proper alignment over time. Each custom tray brings your teeth closer to their final position. Treatment times vary depending on how severe your case is but typically don’t last longer than two years. Once treatment is complete, you may need a retainer for the longest-lasting results.

Since they are clear, most patients find Invisalign® less noticeable than traditional braces. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign® can be removed while eating, meaning patients don’t have to worry about damaging their trays with certain foods. Invisalign® is great for people of all ages and has become a top choice for teens and adults alike.

Invisalign® works well for patients who have:
  • Crooked teeth
  • Gapped or spaced teeth
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Overbites, Underbites, and Crossbites

How Does Invisalign® Work?

Invisalign® works for most patients in a three-step process:
Initial Consultation

Initial Consultation

You will meet with your Invisalign orthodontist in Wilkins, SC. During this consultation, your doctor will take a 3D digital scan of your teeth. From there, they will put together a comprehensive treatment plan customized to your needs. The best part? Before you leave, they will give you a sneak peek at your new smile using an innovative scanner.

First Fitting

First Fitting

During this step, your orthodontist will make sure that your custom aligners fit correctly. If you have any questions, this is the perfect time to ask. Before you leave, your doctor will let you know what to expect over the coming weeks and months. Treatment completion times will vary for patients, but you should see early results in just a few weeks. During this, you will check in regularly with your orthodontist.

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile – Once your treatment is complete, it’s time to show off your new smile to as many people as possible! Be sure to ask your orthodontist if you will need to use a retainer to keep your teeth straight over the long haul. The last thing you want is for your teeth to shift gradually back into their original positions.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces – Which is Right for You?

With so many great teeth straightening options available today, it can be hard to settle on a treatment choice. One of the most common questions we get revolves around which treatment is better: Invisalign® or traditional braces? The answer to that question is nuanced since every patient will have different needs. A younger patient with slightly crooked teeth might benefit from the discreet features of Invisalign®. On the other hand, an older patient with a severe underbite might benefit more from the reliability of traditional braces.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces–Which is Right for You?
Keep in mind the following highlights, which will help you remain informed when doing your research:
Are They Removable? Invisalign® trays can be removed. Traditional braces cannon.
  • Treatment-Length-icon

    Treatment Length

    Invisalign® treatment can last anywhere from six months to two years. Treatment times for traditional braces can last from one to three years. Each time frame can vary depending on the patient’s individual case.

  • Orthodontic-Visits

    Orthodontic Visits:

    With Invisalign®, patients visit their Invisalign dentist in Wilkins, SC, every three months. With traditional braces, patients can expect to visit every month or every other month.

  • Cleaning-icon

    Cleaning

    Regular brushing and flossing is recommended for patients using Invisalign®. A specialized floss threading tool and regular brushing and flossing are recommended for patients with traditional braces.

  • Benefits

    Benefits

    Invisalign® is discrete, comfortable, can be removed, and doesn’t require any food restrictions. Traditional braces offer consistent progress, are effective for severe cases, have time-tested reliability, and can be a good choice for cost-conscious shoppers.

Ready to learn more about Invisalign® in Wilkins, SC? Give our office a call, and we would be happy to get you scheduled for your first consultation.

Contact Us

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Are you craving a beautiful smile but feel that you’re too old for braces? You wouldn’t be the only adult to have that thought. However, the truth is that 25% of our orthodontic patients are now adults. At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, you’re never too old for braces!

We want you to know that a healthy, stunning smile is attainable no matter what age you are. Our orthodontist in Wilkins, SC, offers several treatments that are perfect for working adults and can help you decide if braces are right. If you decide that adult braces are the way to go, we have a number of options for you to consider. From traditional metal braces that offer time-tested results to more discreet options like Invisalign®, your new smile is more attainable than you might think. During your initial visit with our doctor, we will review all of your treatment options and help you choose the one you need for optimal results.

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Benefits of Adult Braces

Most patients understand that a straighter smile is more aesthetic; however, not everyone knows that properly aligned teeth can improve your oral health. Here are just a few reasons why so many adults are optimizing their oral health with adult braces:

Benefits-of-Adult-Braces
More Confidence

More Confidence

If you’re feeling self-conscious about how your teeth look, you’re not alone. Millions of adults around the U.S. aren’t happy with the way that their oral aesthetics. Adult braces help restore your confidence and can give you a smile that you’re proud to show off. When you like the way your teeth look, you’ll be more likely to smile. This simple act makes you feel happier, reduces stress, and can improve your mental health. Plus, it makes people around you feel great too.

Less Bad Breath

Less Bad Breath

Few things are as nasty as speaking to someone with bad breath. We’ve all been there, but it is never any less embarrassing when someone tries to subtlety offer you a mint for your breath. What most folks don’t know is that misaligned teeth and bad breath are often connected. That’s because when your teeth are crooked or over-crowded, bacteria can find their way in between your teeth. This is an area that most toothbrushes can’t reach. With time, that bacteria builds up, and your breath begins to stink. When left unchecked, these bacteria can cause serious health problems.

Better Oral Health

Better Oral Health

When you have poor oral health, there are a number of health risks that should concern you. Misaligned teeth can cause bacteria to build up. Over time, harmful bacteria cause serious problems like cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease. Thankfully, orthodontic treatment can help you avoid severe tooth decay, gum recession, and bone loss. You can even reduce and prevent irregular tooth enamel loss pain associated with TMJ and TMD.

Enjoy More Foods

Enjoy More Foods

If you have never had a major problem with your teeth, you might not know that eating can be painful if you have misaligned teeth. This causes some patients to avoid foods that cause them pain. Adult braces can straighten your teeth and correct over and underbites for patients with severely crooked or crowded teeth. When you don’t have to worry about painful chewing or biting, you can experience the full joy of eating a delicious meal.

Improved Speech

Improved Speech

Having crooked teeth can make you feel self-conscious about your smile, but they can also affect how you pronounce certain words. If you’re having problems pronouncing words because your teeth are severely misaligned, adult braces can change your life. This is especially true for working professionals who speak publicly, take part in Zoom calls, and work over the phone. If this sounds like you, speak to our trusted Invisalign orthodontist in Wilkins, SC, about discreet ways to improve your oral health and speech at the same time.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

Your child’s early and teen years are a great time to consider orthodontic treatment. According to The American Association of Orthodontists, the optimal time for a child to receive their first orthodontic treatment is by age seven. When you treat your child for braces early, you have the opportunity to discover and correct oral issues before they become serious. Doing so gives your child a leg-up on their peers and saves you time and money in the long run.

The overall goal of early orthodontic treatment is to intercept the possible issue, eliminate the cause, oversee facial and jawbone growth, and make sure there is enough space for adult teeth. Depending on how your child’s teeth develop, they may need a second course of treatment after their permanent teeth have formed.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

A few common orthodontic problems that may require treatment for children include:

  • Crossbites – this happens when your child’s jaw shifts to one side.
  • Underbites – this occurs when your child’s front lower teeth are ahead of their front upper teeth.
  • Excessively spaced teeth
  • Extremely crowded teeth
  • Extra teeth
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth that do not meet properly or don’t meet at all
  • Pacifier, finger, or thumb-sucking that affects your child’s jaw or teeth growth

The best way to learn whether your child will need early treatment is to speak with your orthodontist in Wilkins, SC. Dr. Travis, Dr. Katie, and Dr. Gavin are trained to spot subtle problems, even in young children. During your child’s initial consultation, you can expect one of three outcomes:

  • There is a problem that early orthodontic treatment may correct.
  • Treatment may be necessary in the future. We’ll keep an eye on your child’s oral health while their face and jaw matures.
  • There is no treatment necessary at this stage.

Latest News in Wilkins

David Wilkins – 2021 Bond Distinguished Athletes Award Recipient

Note: The following appears in the Boston College football gameday program.Eight years ago, Margaret Segars Bond (‘84) and her late husband, former Clemson golfer Steve Bond (‘80), established the Bond Distinguished Athletes Award. The award honors former Clemson athletes who exemplify great character, citizenship and service while spreading their Tiger spirit into the world. The honor focuses on former Tiger student-athletes who were successful at Clemson and have continued that success for many years af...

Note: The following appears in the Boston College football gameday program.

Eight years ago, Margaret Segars Bond (‘84) and her late husband, former Clemson golfer Steve Bond (‘80), established the Bond Distinguished Athletes Award. The award honors former Clemson athletes who exemplify great character, citizenship and service while spreading their Tiger spirit into the world. The honor focuses on former Tiger student-athletes who were successful at Clemson and have continued that success for many years after graduation.

Past winners include former Clemson University Presidents Jim Barker and Phil Prince, noted physicians Dr. Randy Smith and Dr. Jim Sutherland, Judge Bobby Conrad, lawyer Jimmy Addison, business leader Tom Chapman and Carolyn Creel, the first female to receive a scholarship at Clemson and a leader in the university’s move to co-education.

Now, former Clemson tennis champion David Horton Wilkins, who has served many political appointments, including United States Ambassador to Canada, joins them on the list of noted recipients. He will be honored at the Boston College game and will receive a custom-designed gold ring. His name will be inscribed on a glass plaque prominently displayed by the elevator in Nieri Family Student-Athlete Enrichment Center at Memorial Stadium.

Wilkins was a starter in the Clemson tennis program between 1966-68 (freshmen were not eligible in that era). As a sophomore, he combined with Sammy Smithyman to win the No. 2 doubles championship at the ACC Tournament, then he won the ACC No. 6 singles title in 1967. He then served as team captain as a junior.

Wilkins was a three-year starter in singles and doubles, and he finished his career with a 35-15 record in singles and 24-12 mark in doubles. He was one of just seven Tigers in the decade of the 1960s to win at least two-thirds of his singles and doubles matches. In 1967, he had an 18-3 record in singles, the most singles wins on that team.

He was a big reason Clemson had tremendous success as a team during his career. Clemson had a 39-10 record from 1966-68, including a 27-3 mark at home and a 17-4 ledger in ACC matches. The 1967 team finished No. 26 in the NCAA Tournament, Clemson’s first top-30 final ranking.

Academically, he was named to the ACC Academic Honor Roll as a junior and senior, and he graduated cum laude in 1968. He then earned his law degree from South Carolina in 1971. He served our country as a first lieutenant in the United States Army in the early 1970s and was in the U.S. Army Reserve for four years.

Wilkins began his political career in 1980 as a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives. He served for 25 years, including 11 years as Speaker of the House.

In 2005, he moved to Canada to become the United States Ambassador for four years as a member of the George W. Bush administration.

In 2003, he received an honorary doctorate degree from Clemson and received the Distinguished Service Award from the Clemson Alumni Association. In 2007, he was named to the Clemson Board of Trustees and served a six-year term as Chair of the Board of Trustees beginning in 2009. He continues to serve on the Clemson Board of Trustees.

Wilkins and his wife, Susan, reside in Greenville, S.C. They have two sons, James and Robert, as well as several grandchildren.

After losing her husband to cancer in August 2013, Margaret has fulfilled Steve’s dream to give back to the place they both love so much. She had the joy and privilege of planning this award with him for over a year before he became ill. Steve believed the qualities he learned from being a student-athlete stayed with him his entire life. The Bond Distinguished Athletes Award is an ongoing symbol of this and Steve Bond’s legacy at Clemson University.

“I love Clemson University and I am passionate about my Tigers,” said Margaret. “I loved Steve Bond with all my heart and was determined to carry out his wishes for this award. It has brought me more joy than I ever could have imagined.”

Wednesday headlines: Haley tapped for lifetime Clemson board seat

Former S.C. Gov. and United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, who now lives at Kiawah Island, has been appointed to fill a lifetime seat on the Clemson University Board of Trustees vacated by former House Speaker David Wilkins of Greenville. Wilkins also served as ambassador to Canada in the Bush administration in the early 2000s. More: SC Public Radio, ...

Former S.C. Gov. and United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, who now lives at Kiawah Island, has been appointed to fill a lifetime seat on the Clemson University Board of Trustees vacated by former House Speaker David Wilkins of Greenville. Wilkins also served as ambassador to Canada in the Bush administration in the early 2000s. More: SC Public Radio, The Post and Courier

In other headlines:

First in-person S.C. State Fair since start of pandemic opens today. The South Carolina State Fair returns Wednesday after last year’s drive-thru event brought on by higher numbers of infections during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. More: Associated Press, The State, The Post and Courier

Civil rights groups sue McMaster, state lawmakers over redistricting process. Two civil rights groups are suing South Carolina, saying state lawmakers are taking too long to draw new district maps. More: Associated Press, WCSC TV, The State, The Post and Courier

Charleston ports operating smoothly despite record volume, supply chain woes. More ships are adjusting their schedules to visit Charleston-area ports earlier than planned, with cargo continuing to move smoothly despite record volumes. More: The Post and Courier

Sullivan’s Island seeks attorney opinion on Maritime Forest settlement. Sullivan’s Island Town Council has decided to get an opinion from a Greenville attorney about the legal path forward in their Maritime Forest settlement. More: WCSC TV

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

Nikki Haley named to Clemson Board of Trustees

CLEMSON, S.C. (WYFF) - Nikki Haley, former United States ambassador to the United Nations and former governor of South Carolina, has been named to the Clemson Board of Trustees, the university announced Tuesday.The appointment is effective immediately, officials said.Haley succeeds David Wilkins, of Greenville, who is retiring as a trustee after serving since 2007, including six years as chair. Wilkins will become a trustee emeritus.“Ambassador Haley’s love of country, leadership skills, commitment to educati...

CLEMSON, S.C. (WYFF) - Nikki Haley, former United States ambassador to the United Nations and former governor of South Carolina, has been named to the Clemson Board of Trustees, the university announced Tuesday.

The appointment is effective immediately, officials said.

Haley succeeds David Wilkins, of Greenville, who is retiring as a trustee after serving since 2007, including six years as chair. Wilkins will become a trustee emeritus.

“Ambassador Haley’s love of country, leadership skills, commitment to education, and passion for Clemson University will serve the Board well. She will be a tireless advocate for the University and all of its constituents,” Kim Wilkerson, chair of the Board of Trustees, said in a statement.

Wilkerson was elected to a two-year term as the board’s chair on July 15.

She is the first woman to lead the Clemson board in school history.

Haley graduated with a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Clemson in 1994. After leaving Clemson, she worked for her family business and served as its chief financial officer. Haley’s career in public service began in 2004 with her election to the South Carolina House of Representatives.

In 2010, Haley was elected as the first female and first minority governor of South Carolina and was the youngest governor in the country at that time.

She was re-elected as governor in 2014. In 2016, then-President-elect Donald Trump nominated Haley to be the 29th U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

Haley continued to serve as governor of South Carolina until her confirmation by the U.S. Senate in January 2017.

Haley served as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations until January 2019. During that time, she was also a member of the president’s cabinet and the National Security Council. Since 2019, Haley has led the Stand for America advocacy group, which seeks to promote public policies that strengthen America’s economy, culture, and national security. Born in Bamberg, South Carolina, she is the daughter of Indian immigrants. Haley and her husband, Michael, a combat veteran who was deployed to Afghanistan, have two children and reside in Kiawah Island, South Carolina.

Copyright 2021 WYFF. All rights reserved.

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Sullivan’s Island votes to hire law firm, conduct legal review of Maritime Forest settlement

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is seeking another legal opinion on the town’s Maritime Forest settlement that would allow more cutting operations of the forest. The settlement was part of a more than a decade-long legal battle.Town leaders are looking for a second opinion of the settlement approved by the last town council. The group is challenging the legality and obligations required of the town. Some are optimistic it means the forest can be saved while others say it’s t...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is seeking another legal opinion on the town’s Maritime Forest settlement that would allow more cutting operations of the forest. The settlement was part of a more than a decade-long legal battle.

Town leaders are looking for a second opinion of the settlement approved by the last town council. The group is challenging the legality and obligations required of the town. Some are optimistic it means the forest can be saved while others say it’s time to move forward.

The debate between a special town council meeting Tuesday morning became heated at times.

“Exercising every effort we can to be transparent,” says Town Councilman Scott Millimet.

“It’s just, it’s ludicrous,” says Kay Smith, Sullivan’s Island Town Councilwoman. “I think it’s a shameful way to use our town’s resources.”

The decision to hire legal counsel came down to a controversial vote before hiring Greenville-based William Wilkins and Nexsen Pruet Law Firm to conduct a second opinion of the settlement.

“It’s a good next step in the process of trying to undo the mediation settlement,” says Karen Byko, a Sullivan’s Island resident and President of Sullivan’s Island For All.

“This settlement was really crafted behind closed doors,” says Susan Middaugh, a Sullivan’s Island resident who raised concerns over the way the settlement was approved following the special council meeting.

The law firm will examine the legality, and the town’s required obligations laid out in the settlement. Those opposed to the settlement say it prevents future management of the town’s natural forest.

“The problem with the settlement and why we really need an external review is that it has language in it that binds future town councils,” says Middaugh.

The settlement was reached in October of 2020 after a decade-long legal battle between the Town of Sullivan’s Island V. Bluestein.

Despite the approved settlement, some residents are still fighting for the future of the forest while other residents felt the settlement was the best outcome to be reached.

“A couple of judges, several courts, our own town attorneys and that’s still not good enough,” says Kimberly Brown, a Sullivan’s Island resident who believes the mediation was the best outcome. “I think it seems more like awaiting to find somebody who’ll say what they want to say.”

Some residents remain determined to stop the chop of the Maritime Forest while others say it’s time to put the settlement in the past.

“There comes a time when you say enough you know like we’ve met in the middle, we’ve mediated let’s abide by that,” says Brown. “Let’s honor that, let’s honor what we did.”

Wilkins and the Nexsen Pruet Law Firm are expected to take a closer look at the settlement in the coming weeks ahead of the judicial review deadline. Officials say cutting could start as early as December if approved by the Department of Health and Environmental Control.

No. 6 Clemson leaning on defense early in the season

CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) — Clemson’s defense has come out strong this season and may provide the sixth-ranked Tigers their best path toward staying on top in the Atlantic Coast Conference while their offense gets untracked.Clemson hasn’t allowed a touchdown through two games, something it last accomplished in 2017 with All-Americans Christian Wilkins and Clelin Ferrell leading the way.The Tigers limited Georgia and South Carolina State to just a field goal on offense. Georgia’s touchdown in a 10-3 victory in W...

CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) — Clemson’s defense has come out strong this season and may provide the sixth-ranked Tigers their best path toward staying on top in the Atlantic Coast Conference while their offense gets untracked.

Clemson hasn’t allowed a touchdown through two games, something it last accomplished in 2017 with All-Americans Christian Wilkins and Clelin Ferrell leading the way.

The Tigers limited Georgia and South Carolina State to just a field goal on offense. Georgia’s touchdown in a 10-3 victory in Week One came on a interception return for a score.

“Holding the offenses out of the end zone two straight weeks, it’s not an easy thing to do, regardless of who you’re playing,” Tigers defensive coordinator Brent Venables said.

Defensive tackle Ruke Orhorhoro saw this coming in the spring. It was a mix of players’ eager to show the Tigers weren’t the club that allowed 47 points in a loss at Notre Dame last November or gave up four straight TD passes in the first half to Ohio State’s Justin Fields in a 49-28 playoff loss.

“After we came off that loss, just seeing guys here working out ... showed me that this team’s going to be special and that we’re ready to handle some business,” said Orhorhoro, a sophomore who has found a spot in the regular rotation on a defensive line with seven players who have starting experience. “We’re motivated by winning and just the joy of winning drives us even more.”

Clemson’s defense was the brightest spot in the team’s first season opening loss in seven years.

Georgia’s offense is expected to be one of the country’s best this season, headlined by Southern Cal transfer JT Daniels at quarterback.

The Tigers held Daniels to 135 yards passing with an interception. The Bulldogs’ celebrated run game also struggled with just 121 yards on 31 carries.

Clemson was just as dominant last week in holding South Carolina State of the FCS to a field goal. South Carolina State managed just 235 yards and only 103 on the ground. With Clemson up by 40-plus points and the Bulldogs driving for a feel-good late TD, Tigers reserve linebacker Keith Maguire broke up a fourth-down pass at the goal line.

The Tigers’ defensive starters erupted on the sidelines after the backups kept the no-touchdown run alive.

“The effort was tremendous,” Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said. “We had no penalties, so we had good discipline. No touchdowns allowed.”

Clemson opens Atlantic Coast Conference play at home Saturday against Georgia Tech. The Tigers are favored by more than four touchdowns as they look for their seventh straight win in the series.

The Yellow Jackets scored points all five times they reached the opponent’s 20 yard line in a 45-17 victory over Kennesaw State. Clemson’s defense will be much sterner test.

“I think we’ve got a locker room that’s really bought in,” Yellow Jackets coach Geoff Collins said.

Clemson’s Venables believes that, too, about his group, led by sixth-year super seniors in linebacker James Skalski and safety Nolan Turner. Both were part of the 2016 and 2018 national championship teams and have brought that mentality to this unit, Venables said.

“They’re very driven. You can’t raise the standard high enough for them,” Venables said. “That’s awesome when you have that. You can’t coach that. Guys either have it or they don’t.”

Clemson has a lot of driven players. Defensive tackle includes junior Tyler Davis and sophomore Bryan Bresee, who combined for 11 1-2 tackles behind the line of scrimmage last year. Alongside Skalski at linebacker is fellow “Bruise Brother” in Baylon Spector, the team’s top returning tackler.

Turner has missed the first two games, although he’s not been diagnosed with an injury. Swinney expects him to play against the Yellow Jackets.

Having Turner back, Orhorhoro said, will be another boost to a defense filled with confidence and ready to show itself as the best in the country.

“Since the first day of spring practice, everybody’s been balling out, playing hard,” he said. “That’s really all it is.”

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