Orthodontist in Pritchardville, SC

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A smile is such a simple thing, but it can hold so much power. Smiling is universally considered to be a way that humans display joy. Smiles communicate to others how we’re feeling and are often the best way to break the ice when meeting a new person. A good-natured smile can work wonders, but if you’re like most folks, your smile may not be perfect. Every day, we hear stories from people who feel embarrassed, ashamed, or even scared to flash their smile. In fact, 75% of prospective orthodontic patients could benefit from straighter teeth. Thankfully, Winning Orthodontic Smiles offers affordable orthodontic solutions that give our patients a healthier mouth, more self-esteem, and more confidence.

At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, your smile is our passion. Our orthodontists and hygienists are dedicated to providing you with the best orthodontic care possible in a stress-free, comfortable setting. We know what a difference a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to giving our clients a winning smile they love.

Having served the Lowcountry for more than 30 years, we know that no two patients have the exact orthodontic needs. That’s why we offer a variety of treatment options to correct each patient’s unique concerns, along with payment plans that make braces affordable for every family. You can rest easy knowing that our team specializes in the latest innovations in the field of orthodontics. This allows us to treat our patients in the most efficient, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing ways possible.

A few of our orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina include:
  • Invisalign®
  • Invisalign® Teen
  • Clear Braces
  • Traditional Braces
  • Early Treatment
  • Adult Treatment

If you’re looking for an orthodontist in Pritchardville, SC, who is professional, trustworthy, and compassionate, look no further than Winning Orthodontic Smiles. Your pathway to a beautiful smile starts by selecting the orthodontic treatment option best suited for your needs.

Service Area

Invisalign Treatment

Invisalign® Treatment in Pritchardville, SC

Over the last few years, Invisalign® has become one of the most popular and effective orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina. For those looking for a convenient, comfortable, discreet way to realign their teeth, Invisalign® should be on your shortlist.

What Is Invisalign®?

Invisalign® is a treatment used by orthodontists in Pritchardville that straightens patients’ teeth without traditional braces. Invisalign® works using a succession of custom trays that cover your teeth, which gently pull them into proper alignment over time. Each custom tray brings your teeth closer to their final position. Treatment times vary depending on how severe your case is but typically don’t last longer than two years. Once treatment is complete, you may need a retainer for the longest-lasting results.

Since they are clear, most patients find Invisalign® less noticeable than traditional braces. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign® can be removed while eating, meaning patients don’t have to worry about damaging their trays with certain foods. Invisalign® is great for people of all ages and has become a top choice for teens and adults alike.

Invisalign® works well for patients who have:
  • Crooked teeth
  • Gapped or spaced teeth
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Overbites, Underbites, and Crossbites

How Does Invisalign® Work?

Invisalign® works for most patients in a three-step process:
Initial Consultation

Initial Consultation

You will meet with your Invisalign orthodontist in Pritchardville, SC. During this consultation, your doctor will take a 3D digital scan of your teeth. From there, they will put together a comprehensive treatment plan customized to your needs. The best part? Before you leave, they will give you a sneak peek at your new smile using an innovative scanner.

First Fitting

First Fitting

During this step, your orthodontist will make sure that your custom aligners fit correctly. If you have any questions, this is the perfect time to ask. Before you leave, your doctor will let you know what to expect over the coming weeks and months. Treatment completion times will vary for patients, but you should see early results in just a few weeks. During this, you will check in regularly with your orthodontist.

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile – Once your treatment is complete, it’s time to show off your new smile to as many people as possible! Be sure to ask your orthodontist if you will need to use a retainer to keep your teeth straight over the long haul. The last thing you want is for your teeth to shift gradually back into their original positions.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces – Which is Right for You?

With so many great teeth straightening options available today, it can be hard to settle on a treatment choice. One of the most common questions we get revolves around which treatment is better: Invisalign® or traditional braces? The answer to that question is nuanced since every patient will have different needs. A younger patient with slightly crooked teeth might benefit from the discreet features of Invisalign®. On the other hand, an older patient with a severe underbite might benefit more from the reliability of traditional braces.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces–Which is Right for You?
Keep in mind the following highlights, which will help you remain informed when doing your research:
Are They Removable? Invisalign® trays can be removed. Traditional braces cannon.
  • Treatment-Length-icon

    Treatment Length

    Invisalign® treatment can last anywhere from six months to two years. Treatment times for traditional braces can last from one to three years. Each time frame can vary depending on the patient’s individual case.

  • Orthodontic-Visits

    Orthodontic Visits:

    With Invisalign®, patients visit their Invisalign dentist in Pritchardville, SC, every three months. With traditional braces, patients can expect to visit every month or every other month.

  • Cleaning-icon

    Cleaning

    Regular brushing and flossing is recommended for patients using Invisalign®. A specialized floss threading tool and regular brushing and flossing are recommended for patients with traditional braces.

  • Benefits

    Benefits

    Invisalign® is discrete, comfortable, can be removed, and doesn’t require any food restrictions. Traditional braces offer consistent progress, are effective for severe cases, have time-tested reliability, and can be a good choice for cost-conscious shoppers.

Ready to learn more about Invisalign® in Pritchardville, SC? Give our office a call, and we would be happy to get you scheduled for your first consultation.

Contact Us

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Are you craving a beautiful smile but feel that you’re too old for braces? You wouldn’t be the only adult to have that thought. However, the truth is that 25% of our orthodontic patients are now adults. At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, you’re never too old for braces!

We want you to know that a healthy, stunning smile is attainable no matter what age you are. Our orthodontist in Pritchardville, SC, offers several treatments that are perfect for working adults and can help you decide if braces are right. If you decide that adult braces are the way to go, we have a number of options for you to consider. From traditional metal braces that offer time-tested results to more discreet options like Invisalign®, your new smile is more attainable than you might think. During your initial visit with our doctor, we will review all of your treatment options and help you choose the one you need for optimal results.

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Benefits of Adult Braces

Most patients understand that a straighter smile is more aesthetic; however, not everyone knows that properly aligned teeth can improve your oral health. Here are just a few reasons why so many adults are optimizing their oral health with adult braces:

Benefits-of-Adult-Braces
More Confidence

More Confidence

If you’re feeling self-conscious about how your teeth look, you’re not alone. Millions of adults around the U.S. aren’t happy with the way that their oral aesthetics. Adult braces help restore your confidence and can give you a smile that you’re proud to show off. When you like the way your teeth look, you’ll be more likely to smile. This simple act makes you feel happier, reduces stress, and can improve your mental health. Plus, it makes people around you feel great too.

Less Bad Breath

Less Bad Breath

Few things are as nasty as speaking to someone with bad breath. We’ve all been there, but it is never any less embarrassing when someone tries to subtlety offer you a mint for your breath. What most folks don’t know is that misaligned teeth and bad breath are often connected. That’s because when your teeth are crooked or over-crowded, bacteria can find their way in between your teeth. This is an area that most toothbrushes can’t reach. With time, that bacteria builds up, and your breath begins to stink. When left unchecked, these bacteria can cause serious health problems.

Better Oral Health

Better Oral Health

When you have poor oral health, there are a number of health risks that should concern you. Misaligned teeth can cause bacteria to build up. Over time, harmful bacteria cause serious problems like cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease. Thankfully, orthodontic treatment can help you avoid severe tooth decay, gum recession, and bone loss. You can even reduce and prevent irregular tooth enamel loss pain associated with TMJ and TMD.

Enjoy More Foods

Enjoy More Foods

If you have never had a major problem with your teeth, you might not know that eating can be painful if you have misaligned teeth. This causes some patients to avoid foods that cause them pain. Adult braces can straighten your teeth and correct over and underbites for patients with severely crooked or crowded teeth. When you don’t have to worry about painful chewing or biting, you can experience the full joy of eating a delicious meal.

Improved Speech

Improved Speech

Having crooked teeth can make you feel self-conscious about your smile, but they can also affect how you pronounce certain words. If you’re having problems pronouncing words because your teeth are severely misaligned, adult braces can change your life. This is especially true for working professionals who speak publicly, take part in Zoom calls, and work over the phone. If this sounds like you, speak to our trusted Invisalign orthodontist in Pritchardville, SC, about discreet ways to improve your oral health and speech at the same time.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

Your child’s early and teen years are a great time to consider orthodontic treatment. According to The American Association of Orthodontists, the optimal time for a child to receive their first orthodontic treatment is by age seven. When you treat your child for braces early, you have the opportunity to discover and correct oral issues before they become serious. Doing so gives your child a leg-up on their peers and saves you time and money in the long run.

The overall goal of early orthodontic treatment is to intercept the possible issue, eliminate the cause, oversee facial and jawbone growth, and make sure there is enough space for adult teeth. Depending on how your child’s teeth develop, they may need a second course of treatment after their permanent teeth have formed.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

A few common orthodontic problems that may require treatment for children include:

  • Crossbites – this happens when your child’s jaw shifts to one side.
  • Underbites – this occurs when your child’s front lower teeth are ahead of their front upper teeth.
  • Excessively spaced teeth
  • Extremely crowded teeth
  • Extra teeth
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth that do not meet properly or don’t meet at all
  • Pacifier, finger, or thumb-sucking that affects your child’s jaw or teeth growth

The best way to learn whether your child will need early treatment is to speak with your orthodontist in Pritchardville, SC. Dr. Travis, Dr. Katie, and Dr. Gavin are trained to spot subtle problems, even in young children. During your child’s initial consultation, you can expect one of three outcomes:

  • There is a problem that early orthodontic treatment may correct.
  • Treatment may be necessary in the future. We’ll keep an eye on your child’s oral health while their face and jaw matures.
  • There is no treatment necessary at this stage.

Latest News in Pritchardville

Beaufort Co. schools restart live in-person, virtual classes for students in quarantine

Beaufort County School District is bringing back a virtual school option — but only for some students.Superintendent Frank Rodriguez announced Tuesday evening that the district will offer live virtual instruction for students in quarantine, meaning teachers will hold class for in-person and remote students at the same time via Zoom.Previously, teachers were posting recorded videos of lessons to their classroom sites for quarantining students to watch on their own time, which Rodriguez said was challenging as quarantines g...

Beaufort County School District is bringing back a virtual school option — but only for some students.

Superintendent Frank Rodriguez announced Tuesday evening that the district will offer live virtual instruction for students in quarantine, meaning teachers will hold class for in-person and remote students at the same time via Zoom.

Previously, teachers were posting recorded videos of lessons to their classroom sites for quarantining students to watch on their own time, which Rodriguez said was challenging as quarantines grew.

Last week, one in every eight students of the district’s roughly 21,500-student population was quarantining.

“It has become clear that operating with large quarantine numbers and having teachers try to record instruction and post it to Google Classroom is not sustainable or even perhaps effective,” Rodriguez said Tuesday.

He added that teachers requested the change to live instruction.

However, families who have asked the district to give them back a full-time virtual option — which currently goes against a state budget proviso that’s been hotly debated in recent weeks — might be disappointed.

“This is only for students who are quarantining as a result of a COVID-19 diagnosis or exposure,” district spokesperson Candace Bruder said Wednesday. “This is not a long-term virtual instruction option, nor will it be available to students who are not at school for reasons other than COVID-19.”

Educators who hold these “dual modality” classes will be paid a $1,000 stipend in December for the first semester, lining up with an April bill from the state legislature.

That bills bans schools from holding this type of class “unless it is reasonable and necessary due to extreme and unavoidable circumstances.” It also says that teachers who hold these classes must be paid extra for doing so.

The school board approved the stipend unanimously at its Tuesday meeting, agreeing to pay up to $2 million out of the district’s $82.1 million federal COVID-19 relief funding pot.

Teachers who are quarantining are expected to teach remotely as long as they are not ill, Bruder said.

At least one school won’t start using dual modality right away. The district announced Thursday that Whale Branch Middle School will move to fully-virtual instruction for a full week starting Friday; students will return to in-person classes on Sept. 20.

“With just over fifty percent of the student body in quarantine as a result of being deemed a close-contact of someone with COVID-19, the decision to transition the mode of instruction was made in order to mitigate any potential spread of the virus and ensure the continuity of learning for all students,” Bruder wrote in a Thursday statement.

Between Monday and Wednesday, the district logged 70 new COVID-19 cases, 64 among students and six among staff. There are 2,030 students and 29 staff currently quarantining, Bruder said.

Beaufort County School District has not made numbers available for COVID-19 infections and quarantines by school. However, Bruder said that among the district’s 31 schools, Bluffton Middle School, Whale Branch Middle School and Hilton Head Island Middle School have recorded the most new COVID-19 infections this week.

Since the school year started Aug. 16, the district has logged 740 COVID-19 infections. That’s a little over 3% of the district’s combined 24,400 students and staff.

This story was originally published September 9, 2021 2:12 PM.

Bluffton-Hilton Head Meals On Wheels adds new route for deliveries

BEAUFORT COUNTY, S.C. (WTGS) — The Bluffton-Hilton Head Meals On Wheels expanded its delivery routes in the Lowcountry, adding two new routes in Sun City to accommodate for increased demand in the area.The organization had four existing delivery routes in Hilton Head and three others servicing the greater Bluffton, Pritchardville, and New Riverside region. Now, they celebrate the addition of “Route 8” to meet the needs of a growing population.Joe Scalzo, President of the nonprofit said the new route wouldn&rsq...

BEAUFORT COUNTY, S.C. (WTGS) — The Bluffton-Hilton Head Meals On Wheels expanded its delivery routes in the Lowcountry, adding two new routes in Sun City to accommodate for increased demand in the area.

The organization had four existing delivery routes in Hilton Head and three others servicing the greater Bluffton, Pritchardville, and New Riverside region. Now, they celebrate the addition of “Route 8” to meet the needs of a growing population.

Joe Scalzo, President of the nonprofit said the new route wouldn’t be possible without the volunteers. “Volunteers are truly the heart and soul of who we are,” Scalzo said. “We’ve got 220 volunteers, and I’m happy to say it’s growing every day."

Scalzo said it took six months for the organization to find the 46 new volunteers that they needed to add the eight route.

Now, Scalzo said they are on track to deliver a total of 33,000 meals in 2021 in comparison to the 18,000 meals they delivered in 2018.

According to Scalzo, the organization mainly services people over the age of 60, and the need for more deliveries in the area, he said, was apparent. “This area is growing, and that need is naturally growing, which is why we’re growing to meet that need,” said Scalzo.

Scalzo Said clients work with volunteers to create an individualized plan to make sure clients receive those meals as often as they need. Each meal contains food from every food group. Typically, the meals are delivered hot and ready to eat on weekdays, and on Fridays, the organization delivers two extra frozen meals.

Scalzo said they are more than a meal delivery service. They are also engaged in the overall wellness of their clients providing in-person “check-ins.”

Recently, they started having volunteers call their clients just for good conversation.

Kirsten Myers, the office manager and a volunteer for Meals on Wheels, said these conversations are often the highlight of her day. “That’s one of the things we enjoy,” Myers said. “We love to be able to talk to our clients and make them feel seen and heard.”

Myers moved to South Carolina to take care of her parents as they age. She has a history of working with nonprofits and she said she wants to make sure people like her parents are also taken care of.

“When the opportunity for Meals on Wheels presented itself, it was like, that’s where I want to be,” Myers said. “I know that I want to help folks who don’t have access to nutritious meals have that daily access. And to know that I am making a difference in their quality of life is very important to me.”

Additional volunteer information is on their website.

Beaufort Co. records surge of children with COVID-19; schools have 2,000 in quarantine

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Beaufort County has recorded a 137% year-over-year increase in the number of COVID-19 cases reported among young children from early June to late August, according to an analysis of data from the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

Almost 450 cases have been logged among kids younger than 10 this summer, state data show.

During the same time period last year, though, Beaufort County reported only 189 infections in the age group, according to DHEC data.

Health experts had predicted that the super-contagious delta variant would infect more children in 2021, with kids younger than 12 still ineligible for COVID-19 vaccines.

Those concerns are now officially borne out in the DHEC data.

“Schoolchildren are more susceptible to disease spread for two main reasons,” said Dr. Brannon Traxler, the state’s public health director, during a briefing with reporters Wednesday. “Children’s immune systems are not fully developed, and disease activity thrives when groups of people are close together in indoor settings like schools or child care centers.”

The Beaufort County School District recorded 111 COVID-19 cases in the past three days, between Monday and Wednesday, according to district spokesperson Candace Bruder. Students accounted for 100 of those cases. Eleven employees also tested positive.

The district has surpassed 2,000 people in quarantine, with 1,962 students and 46 staff members currently quarantining, Bruder said. That’s up from 1,355 people in quarantine last week.

Since the start of school on Aug. 16, the district has logged at least 311 COVID-19 cases. Bruder stressed that nurses add new infections and quarantines into the district’s records system throughout the day, meaning that the actual number of infections now is likely higher than what has been reported.

Between Monday and Wednesday, 0.47% of the district’s roughly 21,500 students tested positive for COVID-19. That’s one in every 215 students. Of the district’s roughly 2,900 staff members, 0.38% tested positive over the course of three days.

About 9.1% of district students were quarantining, as of Thursday, along with 1.5% of staff.

Between Aug. 16 and Aug. 22, the district reported 200 student and staff COVID-19 cases.

That means about 0.82% of BCSD’s combined 24,400-person population of students and staff had tested positive for COVID-19 during that time period.

In comparison, roughly 0.72% of Beaufort County’s entire population had tested positive for COVID-19 from Aug. 16 to Aug. 22, according to DHEC and U.S. Census Bureau data.

“Many of our schools are seeing much higher cases of COVID-19 among students and faculty than they were at this time last year,” Traxler, of DHEC, said Wednesday. “This is concerning.”

Beaufort County on Thursday set another record high for its seven-day average of newly confirmed cases.

The county, as of Thursday, was reporting an average of 156 cases every 24 hours, DHEC data show.

The state also announced Thursday two confirmed COVID-19 deaths and one probable coronavirus fatality.

DHEC does not release daily county-level data reflecting the percentage of local cases identified among unvaccinated or fully vaccinated people.

Here’s the latest Beaufort County coronavirus data from DHEC:

New cases reported Thursday: 134 confirmed, 28 probable

New cases reported Wednesday: 130 confirmed, 37 probable

New deaths reported from Wednesday to Thursday: 2 confirmed, 1 probable

Seven-day average of new cases: 156 confirmed infections per day

Two-week incidence rate: 1,338 cases per 100,000 people

Bluffton ZIP code, 29910: 1,416 cases since July 1

Hilton Head Island ZIP code, 29926: 513 cases

Hilton Head ZIP code, 29928: 216 cases

Beaufort ZIP code, 29902: 700 cases

Okatie ZIP code, 29909: 325 cases

This story was originally published August 26, 2021 2:43 PM.

Beaufort County’s school board has approved a 2021-22 calendar. What you need to know

Parents, you can start planning your post-pandemic vacations now. Beaufort County’s school board unanimously approved a calendar Tuesday for the 2021-22 school year.The school year will begin Aug. 16, 2021 and end May 27, 2022. The semesters are unevenly split. The fall semester will last 85 days and end Dec. 17, as students begin winter break; the spring...

Parents, you can start planning your post-pandemic vacations now. Beaufort County’s school board unanimously approved a calendar Tuesday for the 2021-22 school year.

The school year will begin Aug. 16, 2021 and end May 27, 2022. The semesters are unevenly split. The fall semester will last 85 days and end Dec. 17, as students begin winter break; the spring semester will begin Jan. 5 and last 95 days.

Thanksgiving break will run from Nov. 24-26, with an early dismissal for students on Nov. 23. Winter break will run from Dec. 20 to Jan. 5, and spring break will run from April 11 to April 15, the week before Easter.

The first three days of winter break — Dec. 20-22 — and April 11, the first day of spring break, are designated as weather make-up days. This year, the district has permission to conduct all make-up days virtually, which is a departure from prior practice.

Labor Day (Sept. 6), Veterans Day (Nov. 11), Martin Luther King Jr. Day (Jan. 17), Presidents Day (Feb. 21) and Memorial Day (May 30) are marked as holidays for students and staff.

School report cards will go out Oct. 29 for the first quarter, Jan. 17 for the second quarter, March 31 for the third quarter and June 9 for the fourth quarter.

Aug. 9-13, Jan. 4, March 18 and May 31 to June 2 are marked as professional development days for staff.

Graduation ceremonies will be held from May 23-27:

The board voted 10-0 for the uneven calendar over a “traditional” 90-day calendar, which would have placed the end of the fall semester on Jan. 12. Board member David Striebinger was absent.

Mary Stratos, the district’s chief instructional services officer, said Tuesday that the district’s high school principals preferred the uneven split because it gave students options for college enrollment or military deployment in the spring and didn’t divide end-of-course testing across winter break.

Due to the increased testing load in second semester — in the spring, high school students have to take SATs, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, English language learner and career readiness exams, to name a few — a traditional 90-day calendar can short teachers on instructional time, Stratos said.

“In first semester, there’s an average of 1,332 minutes used for testing,” Stratos said. “In second semester, there’s potentially 2,025.”

In previous calendar discussions, teachers have complained that the 85-day semester damages their ability to teach the full curriculum for their courses.

But according to previous district research, students have slightly higher test scores and GPAs when the shortened fall semester is used.

“The results verify that the decision to do 85-95 is a solid one,” board member and former district teacher Mel Campbell said Tuesday. “Particularly, it doesn’t damage the grades, and it does facilitate some of our programs.”

This story was originally published March 3, 2021 2:06 PM.

In COVID-plagued year, how did your Beaufort Co. school perform on SC school report cards?

Clarification: This article has been updated to clarify that elementary and middle schoolers’ English performance is measured on SC READY tests. Beaufort County School District’s math scores have taken a beating in the year and a half since schools first shut down for the COVID-19 pandemic.In math, 8.2% fewer elementary and middle school students are scoring at their grade level, with some schools having just 20% of students on grade level. And in high school, the percentage of students scoring a C or higher ...

Clarification: This article has been updated to clarify that elementary and middle schoolers’ English performance is measured on SC READY tests.

Beaufort County School District’s math scores have taken a beating in the year and a half since schools first shut down for the COVID-19 pandemic.

In math, 8.2% fewer elementary and middle school students are scoring at their grade level, with some schools having just 20% of students on grade level. And in high school, the percentage of students scoring a C or higher on the Algebra 1 exam dropped by 6% across the district between 2018-19 and 2020-21 year (testing data is not available for 2019-20).

Performance on the end-of-course English 1 test for high schoolers rose by 6%, and SC READY English scores declined 0.2% for elementary and middle schoolers.

Graduation rates rose across the district compared with 2018-19.

Across the state, schools performed significantly worse in math and slightly worse in English at lower grades than they did in 2018-19, while high school English scores saw a 6.5% bump.

South Carolina’s Department of Education released its annual school report cards Wednesday, measuring students’ scores on standardized tests, English learners’ proficiency, school quality, high school graduation rates and more.

The report cards normally come with a rank, ranging from “Excellent” to “Unsatisfactory” for each school — something that’s missing this year.

In a Tuesday press conference, State Superintendent Molly Spearman cautioned against comparing this year’s reports to pre-pandemic scores, citing COVID flexibility around testing, different modes of instruction across the state and the possibility that some students didn’t show up for testing.

That’s the reason that rankings aren’t included this year, according to the S.C. Department of Education’s FAQ sheet for the report cards.

“It’s really, really difficult to take the context of these students’ lives away from this assessment data,” Spearman said Tuesday. “We have to look very closely at it and be willing to realize there’s additional support that has to be given to particular areas of the state.”

Even without rankings, the report cards have more information than they contained for the 2019-20 school year, which omitted end-of-year testing results.

In 2020-21, students were required to show up in-person to take end-of-year tests, but they could opt out of testing altogether. In Beaufort County School District, 91.4% of students participated in these in-person tests, above the state average of 87.9%. In spring of 2019, 99.5% of district students took their end-of-year tests.

Even with the chaos of COVID learning and lower-than-normal participation, the report cards still provide the only hard data of school performance since the start of the pandemic.

“I was not shocked at the results. I am very, very concerned about the results,” Spearman said. “Our students, particularly our young students, did not show as much growth as we had hoped and had shown in previous years.”

For the most part, Beaufort County’s numbers are slightly above state averages and in line with declines across South Carolina.

Across the state in 2021, 62.8% of students scored above a C on their English 1 EOCs, and 46.7% did so on algebra 1 EOCs; in 2019, those numbers were 56.3% and 54.9%, respectively.

In Beaufort County, student performance on the English section of the SC READY end-of-year tests for third- through eighth-graders held steady, dropping from 45.5% of students meeting or exceeding expectations for their grade level to 45.3%.

The percentage of students scoring a C or higher on the end-of-course English 1 exam, an introductory-level high school course, increased from 60 to 66%.

Math was a different story. SC READY math scores dropped from 48% meeting or exceeding expectations in 2019 to 39.8% in 2021, and EOC Algebra 1 scores dropped from 60.7% to 54.7% scoring a C or higher.

Five schools — Beaufort Middle, Port Royal Elementary, Robert Smalls International Academy, Joseph Shanklin Elementary and Pritchardville Elementary — saw a more than 15% decrease in SC READY math scores.

Four of those schools had a higher percentage of virtual students than the district average when students began returning to hybrid classes in October 2020.

It’s difficult to track the percentage of virtual vs. in-person students for the school year as a whole because several families switched their decisions mid-year. That’s especially true for elementary schools, where the district pushed especially hard for students to return to buildings.

But on the whole, clusters that had a consistently high percentage of virtual students, such as Whale Branch and Beaufort, saw a higher drop in test scores than their counterparts south of the Broad River, where in-person attendance was higher.

This story was originally published September 1, 2021 4:30 AM.

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