Orthodontist in Port Royal, SC

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A smile is such a simple thing, but it can hold so much power. Smiling is universally considered to be a way that humans display joy. Smiles communicate to others how we’re feeling and are often the best way to break the ice when meeting a new person. A good-natured smile can work wonders, but if you’re like most folks, your smile may not be perfect. Every day, we hear stories from people who feel embarrassed, ashamed, or even scared to flash their smile. In fact, 75% of prospective orthodontic patients could benefit from straighter teeth. Thankfully, Winning Orthodontic Smiles offers affordable orthodontic solutions that give our patients a healthier mouth, more self-esteem, and more confidence.

At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, your smile is our passion. Our orthodontists and hygienists are dedicated to providing you with the best orthodontic care possible in a stress-free, comfortable setting. We know what a difference a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to giving our clients a winning smile they love.

Having served the Lowcountry for more than 30 years, we know that no two patients have the exact orthodontic needs. That’s why we offer a variety of treatment options to correct each patient’s unique concerns, along with payment plans that make braces affordable for every family. You can rest easy knowing that our team specializes in the latest innovations in the field of orthodontics. This allows us to treat our patients in the most efficient, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing ways possible.

A few of our orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina include:
  • Invisalign®
  • Invisalign® Teen
  • Clear Braces
  • Traditional Braces
  • Early Treatment
  • Adult Treatment

If you’re looking for an orthodontist in Port Royal, SC, who is professional, trustworthy, and compassionate, look no further than Winning Orthodontic Smiles. Your pathway to a beautiful smile starts by selecting the orthodontic treatment option best suited for your needs.

Service Area

Invisalign Treatment

Invisalign® Treatment in Port Royal, SC

Over the last few years, Invisalign® has become one of the most popular and effective orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina. For those looking for a convenient, comfortable, discreet way to realign their teeth, Invisalign® should be on your shortlist.

What Is Invisalign®?

Invisalign® is a treatment used by orthodontists in Port Royal that straightens patients’ teeth without traditional braces. Invisalign® works using a succession of custom trays that cover your teeth, which gently pull them into proper alignment over time. Each custom tray brings your teeth closer to their final position. Treatment times vary depending on how severe your case is but typically don’t last longer than two years. Once treatment is complete, you may need a retainer for the longest-lasting results.

Since they are clear, most patients find Invisalign® less noticeable than traditional braces. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign® can be removed while eating, meaning patients don’t have to worry about damaging their trays with certain foods. Invisalign® is great for people of all ages and has become a top choice for teens and adults alike.

Invisalign® works well for patients who have:
  • Crooked teeth
  • Gapped or spaced teeth
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Overbites, Underbites, and Crossbites

How Does Invisalign® Work?

Invisalign® works for most patients in a three-step process:
Initial Consultation

Initial Consultation

You will meet with your Invisalign orthodontist in Port Royal, SC. During this consultation, your doctor will take a 3D digital scan of your teeth. From there, they will put together a comprehensive treatment plan customized to your needs. The best part? Before you leave, they will give you a sneak peek at your new smile using an innovative scanner.

First Fitting

First Fitting

During this step, your orthodontist will make sure that your custom aligners fit correctly. If you have any questions, this is the perfect time to ask. Before you leave, your doctor will let you know what to expect over the coming weeks and months. Treatment completion times will vary for patients, but you should see early results in just a few weeks. During this, you will check in regularly with your orthodontist.

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile – Once your treatment is complete, it’s time to show off your new smile to as many people as possible! Be sure to ask your orthodontist if you will need to use a retainer to keep your teeth straight over the long haul. The last thing you want is for your teeth to shift gradually back into their original positions.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces – Which is Right for You?

With so many great teeth straightening options available today, it can be hard to settle on a treatment choice. One of the most common questions we get revolves around which treatment is better: Invisalign® or traditional braces? The answer to that question is nuanced since every patient will have different needs. A younger patient with slightly crooked teeth might benefit from the discreet features of Invisalign®. On the other hand, an older patient with a severe underbite might benefit more from the reliability of traditional braces.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces–Which is Right for You?
Keep in mind the following highlights, which will help you remain informed when doing your research:
Are They Removable? Invisalign® trays can be removed. Traditional braces cannon.
  • Treatment-Length-icon

    Treatment Length

    Invisalign® treatment can last anywhere from six months to two years. Treatment times for traditional braces can last from one to three years. Each time frame can vary depending on the patient’s individual case.

  • Orthodontic-Visits

    Orthodontic Visits:

    With Invisalign®, patients visit their Invisalign dentist in Port Royal, SC, every three months. With traditional braces, patients can expect to visit every month or every other month.

  • Cleaning-icon

    Cleaning

    Regular brushing and flossing is recommended for patients using Invisalign®. A specialized floss threading tool and regular brushing and flossing are recommended for patients with traditional braces.

  • Benefits

    Benefits

    Invisalign® is discrete, comfortable, can be removed, and doesn’t require any food restrictions. Traditional braces offer consistent progress, are effective for severe cases, have time-tested reliability, and can be a good choice for cost-conscious shoppers.

Ready to learn more about Invisalign® in Port Royal, SC? Give our office a call, and we would be happy to get you scheduled for your first consultation.

Contact Us

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Are you craving a beautiful smile but feel that you’re too old for braces? You wouldn’t be the only adult to have that thought. However, the truth is that 25% of our orthodontic patients are now adults. At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, you’re never too old for braces!

We want you to know that a healthy, stunning smile is attainable no matter what age you are. Our orthodontist in Port Royal, SC, offers several treatments that are perfect for working adults and can help you decide if braces are right. If you decide that adult braces are the way to go, we have a number of options for you to consider. From traditional metal braces that offer time-tested results to more discreet options like Invisalign®, your new smile is more attainable than you might think. During your initial visit with our doctor, we will review all of your treatment options and help you choose the one you need for optimal results.

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Benefits of Adult Braces

Most patients understand that a straighter smile is more aesthetic; however, not everyone knows that properly aligned teeth can improve your oral health. Here are just a few reasons why so many adults are optimizing their oral health with adult braces:

Benefits-of-Adult-Braces
More Confidence

More Confidence

If you’re feeling self-conscious about how your teeth look, you’re not alone. Millions of adults around the U.S. aren’t happy with the way that their oral aesthetics. Adult braces help restore your confidence and can give you a smile that you’re proud to show off. When you like the way your teeth look, you’ll be more likely to smile. This simple act makes you feel happier, reduces stress, and can improve your mental health. Plus, it makes people around you feel great too.

Less Bad Breath

Less Bad Breath

Few things are as nasty as speaking to someone with bad breath. We’ve all been there, but it is never any less embarrassing when someone tries to subtlety offer you a mint for your breath. What most folks don’t know is that misaligned teeth and bad breath are often connected. That’s because when your teeth are crooked or over-crowded, bacteria can find their way in between your teeth. This is an area that most toothbrushes can’t reach. With time, that bacteria builds up, and your breath begins to stink. When left unchecked, these bacteria can cause serious health problems.

Better Oral Health

Better Oral Health

When you have poor oral health, there are a number of health risks that should concern you. Misaligned teeth can cause bacteria to build up. Over time, harmful bacteria cause serious problems like cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease. Thankfully, orthodontic treatment can help you avoid severe tooth decay, gum recession, and bone loss. You can even reduce and prevent irregular tooth enamel loss pain associated with TMJ and TMD.

Enjoy More Foods

Enjoy More Foods

If you have never had a major problem with your teeth, you might not know that eating can be painful if you have misaligned teeth. This causes some patients to avoid foods that cause them pain. Adult braces can straighten your teeth and correct over and underbites for patients with severely crooked or crowded teeth. When you don’t have to worry about painful chewing or biting, you can experience the full joy of eating a delicious meal.

Improved Speech

Improved Speech

Having crooked teeth can make you feel self-conscious about your smile, but they can also affect how you pronounce certain words. If you’re having problems pronouncing words because your teeth are severely misaligned, adult braces can change your life. This is especially true for working professionals who speak publicly, take part in Zoom calls, and work over the phone. If this sounds like you, speak to our trusted Invisalign orthodontist in Port Royal, SC, about discreet ways to improve your oral health and speech at the same time.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

Your child’s early and teen years are a great time to consider orthodontic treatment. According to The American Association of Orthodontists, the optimal time for a child to receive their first orthodontic treatment is by age seven. When you treat your child for braces early, you have the opportunity to discover and correct oral issues before they become serious. Doing so gives your child a leg-up on their peers and saves you time and money in the long run.

The overall goal of early orthodontic treatment is to intercept the possible issue, eliminate the cause, oversee facial and jawbone growth, and make sure there is enough space for adult teeth. Depending on how your child’s teeth develop, they may need a second course of treatment after their permanent teeth have formed.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

A few common orthodontic problems that may require treatment for children include:

  • Crossbites – this happens when your child’s jaw shifts to one side.
  • Underbites – this occurs when your child’s front lower teeth are ahead of their front upper teeth.
  • Excessively spaced teeth
  • Extremely crowded teeth
  • Extra teeth
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth that do not meet properly or don’t meet at all
  • Pacifier, finger, or thumb-sucking that affects your child’s jaw or teeth growth

The best way to learn whether your child will need early treatment is to speak with your orthodontist in Port Royal, SC. Dr. Travis, Dr. Katie, and Dr. Gavin are trained to spot subtle problems, even in young children. During your child’s initial consultation, you can expect one of three outcomes:

  • There is a problem that early orthodontic treatment may correct.
  • Treatment may be necessary in the future. We’ll keep an eye on your child’s oral health while their face and jaw matures.
  • There is no treatment necessary at this stage.

Latest News in Port Royal

Port Royal Veterinary Hospital set for ‘soft opening’ after Tropical Storm Elsa damage

The Port Royal Veterinary Hospital is set to open its doors for a “soft opening” on Oct. 25, just three months after a tornado during Tropical Storm Elsa sent several trees crashing through its roof.“It’s just crazy fantastic the way people in the community have come out to support us,” owner and veterinarian Marikay Campbell said Thursday.Thanks to the efforts of the hospital and its community, Campbell said, they have been able to raise their goal of $100,000 for out-of-pocket costs for the renov...

The Port Royal Veterinary Hospital is set to open its doors for a “soft opening” on Oct. 25, just three months after a tornado during Tropical Storm Elsa sent several trees crashing through its roof.

“It’s just crazy fantastic the way people in the community have come out to support us,” owner and veterinarian Marikay Campbell said Thursday.

Thanks to the efforts of the hospital and its community, Campbell said, they have been able to raise their goal of $100,000 for out-of-pocket costs for the renovations. Their “soft opening” includes appointments for vaccinations, annual exams and treatment for minor illnesses. For now, the facility cannot accept emergency or critical care cases, but they hope to be back up and running by December, according to Campbell. Any surplus from the fundraising will be donated to wildlife and local animal organizations, Campbell said.

“From the time we moved here, we have felt really at home in this community,” Campbell said. “We just want to continue to give back to that.”

Campbell, her wife Shelia Ellis and Robert Ellis, have run the facility in Port Royal since 2009. For them, Campbell said, seeing the damage was heartbreaking. The facility was relatively new and had just been renovated two years before the tornado on July 7. At the time, they had begun allowing clients to come into the building and were getting back on their feet after “the worst” of COVID-19, according to Campbell.

“To just be completely shut down and stopped cold ... it was really devastating,” Campbell said.

Looking on the bright side, she said, is what kept her going.

“We were able to start looking at things from a different perspective,” Campbell said. “None of the animals in hospital were injured, the tree didn’t hit the oxygen tanks so none of that happened, no one in Port Royal was injured in the tornado. [ We] started to focus on all of those things and that’s what has been getting us through.”

Initially, Campbell said, she worried if they would ever reopen. They were looking at an estimated $1 million in damages and needed beams for their roof that could not be found on the east coast, Campbell said. They had water damage and needed to replace surgical equipment. In August, a truck crashed into storage pods containing the equipment and tools that were salvaged from the storm.

“That was a whole other can of worms,” Campbell said.

The uncertainty was the worst part, she said, but the community support was “amazing” and has left her eagerly anticipating the “joyful occasion” that will occur when they do reopen.

“I am kind of awestruck at the way people have reached out and picked us up and helped us,” Campbell said.

Water is slowly draining from Port Royals’ bird Mecca, Cypress Wetlands. Here’s why

If you’ve noticed the water level dropping at Port Royal’s Cypress Wetlands — home to hundreds of wading birds, turtles and alligators — you’re right.The intentional draw-down comes in advance of a project to install water control equipment. That project, the town says, will provide protections for the wetlands’ communal bird nesting grounds and native cypress trees, with only temporary impacts to birds and alligators that live in the swamp.Installing the new water control structure is the fi...

If you’ve noticed the water level dropping at Port Royal’s Cypress Wetlands — home to hundreds of wading birds, turtles and alligators — you’re right.

The intentional draw-down comes in advance of a project to install water control equipment. That project, the town says, will provide protections for the wetlands’ communal bird nesting grounds and native cypress trees, with only temporary impacts to birds and alligators that live in the swamp.

Installing the new water control structure is the final step in a restoration project. Plants and trees had grown too thick, threatening the birds in the urban rookery in the heart of downtown.

Located right off busy Ribaut Avenue, the wetland attracts hundreds of nesting wading birds including white ibis, great and snowy egrets and little blue, green, tricolored and black crested night herons. It’s a birdwatcher’s paradise, with a boardwalk providing front-row seats, and you’ll probably see an alligator or two, as well.

It’s the second time in the past 10 months the wetland has been lowered for restoration work.

As of Thursday, the wetland had been lowered 6 inches, said Dean Harrigal, a wildlife biologist with Folk Land Management Inc., which is working with the town on the project. It has another foot to foot-and-a-half to drop before work can begin.

Mud flats will be visible when the drawdown is complete.

“Any negative impacts will be temporary,” Harrigal says.

Cypress Wetlands is one of a series of naturally occurring wetland basins in Port Royal used to catch and control stormwater runoff.

About 20 years ago, the town connected the basins with canals and culverts to utilize them as retention ponds. At the same time, work began to restore the wetlands. Islands where birds could safely nest, protected from predators, were constructed. Native tupelo and cypress trees were planted.

“It was a great success,” Harrigal says.

Over time, however, non-native tallow trees proliferated, transforming the island into a dense forest, which is habitat for raccoons that prey on bird eggs. Numbers of nesting birds declined, according to Friends of Cypress Wetlands, a not-for-profit that supports wetlands and rookery. The wetland also became clogged with plants such as swamp loosestrife, slowing the water flow through the basins. In addition, mats formed on the surface. Raccoons used them to cross the water.

In December, the city spent $400,000 in a project to clean out the clogged water. A third island was added.

The last step is installing a water control structure and outflow ditch. With better control of the water level in the pool, the town will be able to increase protection of the bird rookeries, improve water quality and protect downstream cypress trees that need moist conditions but not flooding, Harrigal says.

Initially, the work was planned earlier in the year, but COVID-19 delayed the necessary permits, and then birds returned to nest in the spring. The water control work was pushed back “to be prudent,” Harrigal said. “We didn’t want to scare them off the nest,” Harrigal said.

Birds roost in the area in the fall and winter, but don’t nest, he said.

The work, which is expected to begin in a few weeks, will be a disturbance, but he added, “They’re not just going to disappear.” Large numbers of birds will take advantage of the drawdown, Harrigal says, by foraging for food in the exposed mud.

As for alligators, he says, “They’ll just wait it out.” Alligators, he noted, are an unlikely ally of the birds. As alligators patrol waters under nests hoping an unlucky bird will fall out of the nest, they also deter predators from using the water to reach nests.

The goal is to have the water control system installed by the end of the year, Harrigal said.

Town Mananager Van Willis said the final cost of installing the water control system is not known yet, but it will be paid for using stormwater utility fees. Cypress Wetlands will remain open during the work, he said.

On Thursday, visitors strolled on the elevated boardwalk, passing alligators and turtles soaking up the sun. Most bird rookeries, Harrigal said, are located in isolated areas, but the number in urban or suburban areas is increasing. Birds will tolerate people, he said, as long as they are not too close.

“Here, we’ve hit the sweet spot,” Harrigal said of Cypress Wetlands.

Beaufort Food Truck Festival returns. Here’s why it’s been moved to Port Royal

The Beaufort Food Truck Festival is back Saturday after a year off, but it’s returning with a few twists. The festival, which benefits the Lowcountry Jaycees and a camp for people with cognitive disabilities, will feature a beer tent for adults and a petting zoo for kids this year, in addition to its staple of great food and live music.The biggest change for the fourth Food Truck Festival is the location. Food trucks will lined up between 6th and 10th streets on Paris Avenue in downtown Port Royal. In the previous two years the ...

The Beaufort Food Truck Festival is back Saturday after a year off, but it’s returning with a few twists. The festival, which benefits the Lowcountry Jaycees and a camp for people with cognitive disabilities, will feature a beer tent for adults and a petting zoo for kids this year, in addition to its staple of great food and live music.

The biggest change for the fourth Food Truck Festival is the location. Food trucks will lined up between 6th and 10th streets on Paris Avenue in downtown Port Royal. In the previous two years the festival was held, in 2018 and 2019, it had been located at the Beaufort Town Center. COVID-19 canceled the 2020 event.

Nick Mayrand, president of the Lowcountry Jaycees, which sponsors the event, said it was moved to Port Royal because more space was needed.

Expect 500 to 1,000 people to be at the Food Truck Festival at any given time, Mayrand said.

You might recognize some of the food trucks: Smokin’ Gringos, which serves tacos, burritos and quesadillas with noteworthy smokin’ hot sauce; Golden Sun, which serves Filipino food; New Jade and its jerk chicken, oxtail, and Jamaican style beef patties; Krystyna’s, a Polish food truck; and Chazito’s Latin Cuisine.

But that’s just a taste. A dozen food trucks will be on hand, and several crafts vendors.

The animal petting zoo and yard games were added for the kids this year. And the beer tent is new as well, a request from past festival attendees that was granted.

Even an ax-throwing area will be part of the entertainment at this year’s festival.

Enjoy live music all day featuring Campfire Tyler, Kev Greaves with Veteran’s Pride Entertainment and Steel Rail Express.

Food trucks will open at 11 a.m. and stop serving at 8 p.m.

The fundraiser by The Lowcountry Jaycees benefits Jaycee Camp Hope in Pendleton, near Clemson University, a statewide camp for individuals with cognitive disabilities age 7 and older. Established in 1969, Jaycee Camp Hope gives campers healthy experiences outdoors. Mayrand said the local chapter’s contribution from the Food Truck Festival may be the largest in the state.

Lowcountry Jaycees also will be collecting clothing to donate to areas affected by Hurricane Ida. A donation box available at Food Truck Festival.

This story was originally published October 6, 2021 2:00 PM.

Beaufort and Port Royal area businesses were flooding. Then, crews found a hubcap

Hubcaps wedged in an underground storm drain pipe — not one, but two — were to blame for recent flooding problems off Ribaut Road near the Beaufort-Port Royal boundary. Public works officials weren’t that surprised.“You get all kinds of different stuff in there you wouldn’t think would be down there,” said Nate Farrow, the City of Beaufort’s Public Works Director.Acting like a stopper in a bathtub, the hubcaps jammed a storm drainage pipe, Farrow said. City officials say the hubcaps are...

Hubcaps wedged in an underground storm drain pipe — not one, but two — were to blame for recent flooding problems off Ribaut Road near the Beaufort-Port Royal boundary. Public works officials weren’t that surprised.

“You get all kinds of different stuff in there you wouldn’t think would be down there,” said Nate Farrow, the City of Beaufort’s Public Works Director.

Acting like a stopper in a bathtub, the hubcaps jammed a storm drainage pipe, Farrow said. City officials say the hubcaps are an example of how foreign objects — some of them unusual — end up in the storm drains and cause major problems on the surface that can require tens of thousands of dollars to repair.

Recently, Eadie’s Constrution Inc. of Ridgeville, a contractor hired by the city, stuck a camera into a 24-inch storm drain pipe running along the east side of Ribaut Road near Johnny Morrall Circle. The problem was discovered 125 feet into the pipe: Two hubcaps stuck sideways in tree roots that had penetrated the conduit.

The blockage had been causing flooding of United Way, Burger King and Mr. Seafood properties near the Beaufort-Port Royal boundary, Farrow said.

“You never know what you’re going to find inside the pipes,” said Farrow, who’s seen it all inside storm drain pipes, including basketballs and soccer balls.

How could a hubcap get into the storm drain?

Four-foot long box culverts are located on the sides of city streets. That’s where stormwater drains. A hubcap could have popped off in a car accident, Farrow speculated, or maybe somebody drove a car onto a curb, with a storm washing them underground.

“Then they can float and be pushed down the pipe and they can wedge sideways,” Farrow said.

Neal Pugliese, who handles special projects for the city of Beaufort, said people tend to treat storm drains like they are trash receptacles, which can be an expensive mistake for taxpayers.

“Something as small and diminutive as a hubcap can cause people to experience catastrophic flooding,” Pugliese said. “It’s the little things that add up to be big things. We all need to be neighborly and understand the impact of what we do.”

Construction materials and yard waste are two additional items often found inside storm drains. The city tries to work with construction and landscaping companies before cracking down on these offenses but will if there are repeated issues, Pugliese added. That goes for residents, too.

“So when you see people blowing debris down the road and they point it to a drainage basin that’s the wrong answer,” Pugliese said.

Eadies specializes in extracting debris, blasting water into the pipes and vacuuming out the debris. Working at night, it spent three days cleaning out the pipe near Ribaut Road/Johnny Morrall Circle. It still has work to do east of the intersection, extending to the Beaufort River.

The blockage caused by the hubcaps is “case exemplar” of the importance of cooperation between Beaufort, Port Royal, Beaufort County and the state in maintaining and cleaning storm drainage systems that meander across jurisdictions, Pugliese said.

For a city, Pugliese said, failing to complete preventative maintenance on city storm drainage system, like the recently completed $6.5 million Mossy Oaks project, is like a car owner failing to take care of a Lamborghini.

“It’s one thing to put in a beautiful gold-plated system, but that storm drainage system is nothing if it is not maintained,” he said.

When the city worked on the Mossy Oaks storm drainage project, Pugliese said, workers filled 40-yard containers with tables, chairs, axles, tires and hand tools. Those items were pulled from drainage ditches.

Former school nurse sues principal, Beaufort Co. schools, claims she was forced to retire

A former school nurse is suing her principal and Beaufort County School District for terminating her last school year without cause and breach of contract, according to a lawsuit filed Oct. 8.In the lawsuit, Deborah Hughes claims that her principal at Port Ro...

A former school nurse is suing her principal and Beaufort County School District for terminating her last school year without cause and breach of contract, according to a lawsuit filed Oct. 8.

In the lawsuit, Deborah Hughes claims that her principal at Port Royal Elementary School, Vicki Goude, “interfered with (her) personal and professional life” and falsely accused her of “medical mistakes.”

She also claims that the school district was grossly negligent in supervising Goude, who was in her first year as principal, despite being “on notice that Defendant Goude engaged in retaliatory employment practices” after other employees complained to district officials.

District spokesperson Candace Bruder declined to comment, saying it was a personnel issue.

Hughes was hired by the district in 1999 and worked as the school nurse until May, two months before she was planning to retire. She had already sent notice of her retirement to her principal in March and to the district in April, according to the suit.

Hughes says she was called to the office of the district head of human resources, Alice Walton, in May, one day after administering insulin injections to a diabetic student.

“Walton asked (Hughes) if she knew why she was there and, ‘what an egregious thing she had done,’” the suit reads, though it does not note why Walton says that.

Walton then told Hughes she was being fired, and Hughes asked if she could retire or resign instead to keep her insurance. She was “told she could retire and keep her benefits if she wrote a letter of retirement, signed, and dated it,” which she did that day, according to the lawsuit.

Walton declined to comment via district spokesperson Bruder.

Hughes claims that her problems with Goude began earlier that year.

According to the lawsuit, Goude “frequently found issues when (Hughes) would momentarily forget to wear her face mask, when she got behind in filling out Covid paperwork, and when she was not as computer-savvy as younger nurses at other schools.”

Goude would call Hughes into her office “weekly, sometimes daily to discuss these issues,” at one point telling Hughes to “’write down everything because (she) can’t remember anything,’” according to the suit.

Hughes also claims that Goude made “pretextual complaints” about her handling of another situation: In April, a student’s mother came to the school to discuss her child’s seizure disorder and then began to have a seizure herself, which Hughes claims she treated her for.

Hughes is represented by Samantha Albrecht of Columbia-based law firm Cromer Babb Porter & Hicks LLC. The lawsuit asks that Goude and the district pay damages for her “loss of employment, loss of future earning capacity, humiliation, embarrassment, mental anguish, and severe reputational loss.” She has requested a jury trial.

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