Orthodontist in Laurel Bay, SC

Ask us Anything

Free Consultation

A smile is such a simple thing, but it can hold so much power. Smiling is universally considered to be a way that humans display joy. Smiles communicate to others how we’re feeling and are often the best way to break the ice when meeting a new person. A good-natured smile can work wonders, but if you’re like most folks, your smile may not be perfect. Every day, we hear stories from people who feel embarrassed, ashamed, or even scared to flash their smile. In fact, 75% of prospective orthodontic patients could benefit from straighter teeth. Thankfully, Winning Orthodontic Smiles offers affordable orthodontic solutions that give our patients a healthier mouth, more self-esteem, and more confidence.

At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, your smile is our passion. Our orthodontists and hygienists are dedicated to providing you with the best orthodontic care possible in a stress-free, comfortable setting. We know what a difference a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to giving our clients a winning smile they love.

Having served the Lowcountry for more than 30 years, we know that no two patients have the exact orthodontic needs. That’s why we offer a variety of treatment options to correct each patient’s unique concerns, along with payment plans that make braces affordable for every family. You can rest easy knowing that our team specializes in the latest innovations in the field of orthodontics. This allows us to treat our patients in the most efficient, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing ways possible.

A few of our orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina include:
  • Invisalign®
  • Invisalign® Teen
  • Clear Braces
  • Traditional Braces
  • Early Treatment
  • Adult Treatment

If you’re looking for an orthodontist in Laurel Bay, SC, who is professional, trustworthy, and compassionate, look no further than Winning Orthodontic Smiles. Your pathway to a beautiful smile starts by selecting the orthodontic treatment option best suited for your needs.

Service Area

Invisalign Treatment

Invisalign® Treatment in Laurel Bay, SC

Over the last few years, Invisalign® has become one of the most popular and effective orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina. For those looking for a convenient, comfortable, discreet way to realign their teeth, Invisalign® should be on your shortlist.

What Is Invisalign®?

Invisalign® is a treatment used by orthodontists in Laurel Bay that straightens patients’ teeth without traditional braces. Invisalign® works using a succession of custom trays that cover your teeth, which gently pull them into proper alignment over time. Each custom tray brings your teeth closer to their final position. Treatment times vary depending on how severe your case is but typically don’t last longer than two years. Once treatment is complete, you may need a retainer for the longest-lasting results.

Since they are clear, most patients find Invisalign® less noticeable than traditional braces. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign® can be removed while eating, meaning patients don’t have to worry about damaging their trays with certain foods. Invisalign® is great for people of all ages and has become a top choice for teens and adults alike.

Invisalign® works well for patients who have:
  • Crooked teeth
  • Gapped or spaced teeth
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Overbites, Underbites, and Crossbites

How Does Invisalign® Work?

Invisalign® works for most patients in a three-step process:
Initial Consultation

Initial Consultation

You will meet with your Invisalign orthodontist in Laurel Bay, SC. During this consultation, your doctor will take a 3D digital scan of your teeth. From there, they will put together a comprehensive treatment plan customized to your needs. The best part? Before you leave, they will give you a sneak peek at your new smile using an innovative scanner.

First Fitting

First Fitting

During this step, your orthodontist will make sure that your custom aligners fit correctly. If you have any questions, this is the perfect time to ask. Before you leave, your doctor will let you know what to expect over the coming weeks and months. Treatment completion times will vary for patients, but you should see early results in just a few weeks. During this, you will check in regularly with your orthodontist.

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile – Once your treatment is complete, it’s time to show off your new smile to as many people as possible! Be sure to ask your orthodontist if you will need to use a retainer to keep your teeth straight over the long haul. The last thing you want is for your teeth to shift gradually back into their original positions.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces – Which is Right for You?

With so many great teeth straightening options available today, it can be hard to settle on a treatment choice. One of the most common questions we get revolves around which treatment is better: Invisalign® or traditional braces? The answer to that question is nuanced since every patient will have different needs. A younger patient with slightly crooked teeth might benefit from the discreet features of Invisalign®. On the other hand, an older patient with a severe underbite might benefit more from the reliability of traditional braces.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces–Which is Right for You?
Keep in mind the following highlights, which will help you remain informed when doing your research:
Are They Removable? Invisalign® trays can be removed. Traditional braces cannon.
  • Treatment-Length-icon

    Treatment Length

    Invisalign® treatment can last anywhere from six months to two years. Treatment times for traditional braces can last from one to three years. Each time frame can vary depending on the patient’s individual case.

  • Orthodontic-Visits

    Orthodontic Visits:

    With Invisalign®, patients visit their Invisalign dentist in Laurel Bay, SC, every three months. With traditional braces, patients can expect to visit every month or every other month.

  • Cleaning-icon

    Cleaning

    Regular brushing and flossing is recommended for patients using Invisalign®. A specialized floss threading tool and regular brushing and flossing are recommended for patients with traditional braces.

  • Benefits

    Benefits

    Invisalign® is discrete, comfortable, can be removed, and doesn’t require any food restrictions. Traditional braces offer consistent progress, are effective for severe cases, have time-tested reliability, and can be a good choice for cost-conscious shoppers.

Ready to learn more about Invisalign® in Laurel Bay, SC? Give our office a call, and we would be happy to get you scheduled for your first consultation.

Contact Us

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Are you craving a beautiful smile but feel that you’re too old for braces? You wouldn’t be the only adult to have that thought. However, the truth is that 25% of our orthodontic patients are now adults. At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, you’re never too old for braces!

We want you to know that a healthy, stunning smile is attainable no matter what age you are. Our orthodontist in Laurel Bay, SC, offers several treatments that are perfect for working adults and can help you decide if braces are right. If you decide that adult braces are the way to go, we have a number of options for you to consider. From traditional metal braces that offer time-tested results to more discreet options like Invisalign®, your new smile is more attainable than you might think. During your initial visit with our doctor, we will review all of your treatment options and help you choose the one you need for optimal results.

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Benefits of Adult Braces

Most patients understand that a straighter smile is more aesthetic; however, not everyone knows that properly aligned teeth can improve your oral health. Here are just a few reasons why so many adults are optimizing their oral health with adult braces:

Benefits-of-Adult-Braces
More Confidence

More Confidence

If you’re feeling self-conscious about how your teeth look, you’re not alone. Millions of adults around the U.S. aren’t happy with the way that their oral aesthetics. Adult braces help restore your confidence and can give you a smile that you’re proud to show off. When you like the way your teeth look, you’ll be more likely to smile. This simple act makes you feel happier, reduces stress, and can improve your mental health. Plus, it makes people around you feel great too.

Less Bad Breath

Less Bad Breath

Few things are as nasty as speaking to someone with bad breath. We’ve all been there, but it is never any less embarrassing when someone tries to subtlety offer you a mint for your breath. What most folks don’t know is that misaligned teeth and bad breath are often connected. That’s because when your teeth are crooked or over-crowded, bacteria can find their way in between your teeth. This is an area that most toothbrushes can’t reach. With time, that bacteria builds up, and your breath begins to stink. When left unchecked, these bacteria can cause serious health problems.

Better Oral Health

Better Oral Health

When you have poor oral health, there are a number of health risks that should concern you. Misaligned teeth can cause bacteria to build up. Over time, harmful bacteria cause serious problems like cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease. Thankfully, orthodontic treatment can help you avoid severe tooth decay, gum recession, and bone loss. You can even reduce and prevent irregular tooth enamel loss pain associated with TMJ and TMD.

Enjoy More Foods

Enjoy More Foods

If you have never had a major problem with your teeth, you might not know that eating can be painful if you have misaligned teeth. This causes some patients to avoid foods that cause them pain. Adult braces can straighten your teeth and correct over and underbites for patients with severely crooked or crowded teeth. When you don’t have to worry about painful chewing or biting, you can experience the full joy of eating a delicious meal.

Improved Speech

Improved Speech

Having crooked teeth can make you feel self-conscious about your smile, but they can also affect how you pronounce certain words. If you’re having problems pronouncing words because your teeth are severely misaligned, adult braces can change your life. This is especially true for working professionals who speak publicly, take part in Zoom calls, and work over the phone. If this sounds like you, speak to our trusted Invisalign orthodontist in Laurel Bay, SC, about discreet ways to improve your oral health and speech at the same time.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

Your child’s early and teen years are a great time to consider orthodontic treatment. According to The American Association of Orthodontists, the optimal time for a child to receive their first orthodontic treatment is by age seven. When you treat your child for braces early, you have the opportunity to discover and correct oral issues before they become serious. Doing so gives your child a leg-up on their peers and saves you time and money in the long run.

The overall goal of early orthodontic treatment is to intercept the possible issue, eliminate the cause, oversee facial and jawbone growth, and make sure there is enough space for adult teeth. Depending on how your child’s teeth develop, they may need a second course of treatment after their permanent teeth have formed.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

A few common orthodontic problems that may require treatment for children include:

  • Crossbites – this happens when your child’s jaw shifts to one side.
  • Underbites – this occurs when your child’s front lower teeth are ahead of their front upper teeth.
  • Excessively spaced teeth
  • Extremely crowded teeth
  • Extra teeth
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth that do not meet properly or don’t meet at all
  • Pacifier, finger, or thumb-sucking that affects your child’s jaw or teeth growth

The best way to learn whether your child will need early treatment is to speak with your orthodontist in Laurel Bay, SC. Dr. Travis, Dr. Katie, and Dr. Gavin are trained to spot subtle problems, even in young children. During your child’s initial consultation, you can expect one of three outcomes:

  • There is a problem that early orthodontic treatment may correct.
  • Treatment may be necessary in the future. We’ll keep an eye on your child’s oral health while their face and jaw matures.
  • There is no treatment necessary at this stage.

Latest News in Laurel Bay

MCAS Beaufort creates maps of Laurel Bay sites being tested

BEAUFORT, S.C. (WSAV) – Testing is still going on at the Laurel Bay housing development on MCAS Beaufort, as health concerns from the military families who live there continue to be raised.A map put out by the Marine Corps shows the groundwater at 100 of the 110 home sites is being checked.The rest of the homes, marked in green, show sites that no further testing is necessary.Marine Corps officials say there is still “no” information linking Laurel Bay to Cancer and health issues.The base has sai...

BEAUFORT, S.C. (WSAV) – Testing is still going on at the Laurel Bay housing development on MCAS Beaufort, as health concerns from the military families who live there continue to be raised.

A map put out by the Marine Corps shows the groundwater at 100 of the 110 home sites is being checked.

The rest of the homes, marked in green, show sites that no further testing is necessary.

Marine Corps officials say there is still “no” information linking Laurel Bay to Cancer and health issues.

The base has said all 1251 oil tanks that had been buried at Laurel Bay are now gone.

Navy health officials are expected to finish a comprehensive study sometime this spring.

Your child is getting sick and you don’t know why. But you think it could be because of where you live.

That’s what some families from MCAS Beaufort are facing right now -and asking the marine corps for answers..

Oil tanks that once kept Marine Corps families warm, now may be responsible for making them sick.

That’s what some families are saying about the Laurel Bay housing complex on the MCAS Beaufort base.

Those tanks have been taken out of the ground. That work was finished according to base officials in 2015. But what they may have left behind has folks asking a lot of questions, and led to a lot of worry.

“The youngest of my three started showing symptoms after we moved in. at the time we didn’t know those symptoms were connected to leukemia.”

Lots of people, lots of questions at a informational meeting last week on MCAS Beaufort.

The Marine Corps just released the video of that meeting, and base commander Colonel Peter Buck’s words about what’s going on. To ease familes fears about cancer being caused by their community.

“I made a promise to them, i make a promise to you and I make a promise to your families in Laurel Bay, said Colonel Peter Buck, MCAS Beaufort Commanding Officer. “That promise is a will act once i get some answers and take the appropriate steps,”

Steps which right now include an extensive study with DHEC, about the soil and water under the Laurel Bay housing complex.

It stems from oil tanks which in the 1950’s heated the homes at Laurel Bay. Storage tanks were put inside those homes.

In the 1980’s the base switched to geothermal heating, and in 2007 the Marine Corps started the process of removing the tanks. In 2015, the Corps says all 1251 tanks were removed.

Buck says that DHEC was consulted before taking out those tanks, and the same level of scrutiny went into that removal as gas station tank removal.

That’s the same year Colonel Buck says two families came to him expressing concern over a possible “cancer cluster”, involving children from MCAS who lived at Laurel Bay. The chemicals left behind could be making children sick.

34 houses which may have had a link. only 2 which MCAS are going back for more testing. One parent even took to youtube to express her anger and worry.

“Our daughter Katie has cancer. And actually theIr have been eight children diagnosed with cancer over the past few years that also lived in the Laurel Bay Housing community,” said Amanda Whatley.

Amanda Whatley’s video has now been watched more than 40,000 times across the area, the nation and the globe.

During the 18 minute video she shows a picture of her daughter Katie, talks about Katie’s leukemia diagnosis back in 2015, and blames oil tanks once buried under the Laurel Bay housing community for possible benzene contamination.

Colonel Buck says MCAS is investigating because of the claims, but he is not concerned yet.

“I live in Laurel Bay with my wife and children.,” said Colonel Buck. “I feel safe living there.”

But other parents weren’t so confident. Either because of questions about the Corps delay in studying the issue.

“You said there were two families that came forward, why do you only talk about two families?”

“Those were the two that came forward”

“There were seven. one of them was mine. I just wanted to know they weren’t mentioned.”

“We were never aware until someone knocked on my door telling me the levels on my house. We were never aware of any of thise. And now of course we are very scared with two premature babies at home. and one that is symptomatic.”

Or just because that’s where their child live now.

“I have two sons 1 and 3 and they play in the dirt daily, and the one year old sometimes he eats the dirt.’

“My youngest of the three started showing symptoms about a month after we got here. We didnt know those sympton were signs of leukemia. We are in the process of getting him tested now. We were never aware until someone knocked on my door telling me the levels on my house. We were never aware of any of thise. And now of cousre we are very scared with two premature babies at home. and one that is symptomatic. Is theer any way we are able to leave because as of last year our levels were 2.2. I have a family member that works for osha and he says levels working with me 1.8 ppm in a 24 hour period… and not more than an 8 year old period. we are exposed to a 2.2. What are you going to do?”

Colonel Buck promises the study is ongoing and surpasses basic EPA guidelines. The Corps plans to test the water and soil, do epidemiological and environmental testing to find out what, if anything, may be going on.

“There is nothing right now that says anything actionable is going on that i can do anything with. There is no smoking gun, there is no smoke in the gun,” says Col. Buck.

The Marine Corps says the started a study on Laurel Bay after two families came to them with complaints about cancer stricken children.

But parents at the town hall says they’ve heard of as many as 24 families affected.

Colonel Buck promises answers when “all” the data is collected.

UPDATE: Class Action Lawsuit Filed by Laurel Bay Families

BEAUFORT, S.C. (WSAV) – Beaufort families have filed a new class-action lawsuit against the Laurel Bay housing complex on the Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS).According to the suit, MCAS “Intentionally and knowingly exposed families to environmental contamination.”Eleven families are specifically named in the suit, with “thousands more former residents included as potential “Muc...

BEAUFORT, S.C. (WSAV) – Beaufort families have filed a new class-action lawsuit against the Laurel Bay housing complex on the Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS).

According to the suit, MCAS “Intentionally and knowingly exposed families to environmental contamination.”

Eleven families are specifically named in the suit, with “thousands more former residents included as potential “

Much of the suit stems from the storage tanks that were in the complex.

The tanks were there in the 1950’s-1970’s to heat the homes, but what was left behind instead were tanks “contaminated” with pesticides and cancer-causing chemicals.

One of the people named in the suit is Amanda Whatley, who made a Youtube video last year detailing the possible connection between her daughter’s cancer and living at Laurel Bay.READ MORE: Summons & Complaint | Amanda Whatley, et al v. Atlantic Marine Corps Communities LLC, et al

“Had I had it in the back of my mind that cancer was happening to children that live where we lived,” said Whatley. “I would have taken her to the doctor so much sooner.”

51,000 people have seen that video and a dozen or more families have come forward with similar cancer issues.

This suit also details problems with asbestos and lead paint found on playgrounds and outside buildings.

It adds that the company that ran the complex, Atlantic Marine Corps Communities (AMCC), didn’t tell families about the hazards.It provided “no warning” to residents and showed “reckless disregard” for the consequences.

It provided “no warning” to residents and showed “reckless disregard” for the consequences.

The Marines heard some current and former residents complaints at a meeting back in February.

But insisted then there was “no” evidence of major chemical issues.

“There is nothing right now that is an actionable concern that we need to do something with,” said Col. Peter Buck, MCAS Commander in February. “There is no smoking gun. In fact, there is no smoke in the gun.”

The class action suit is asking for undisclosed monetary damages against AMCC.

Marine Corps officials have done a health study and promised families the results by last spring. Those results have now been delayed until some time this fall.

Marine families at Laurel Bay deserve more research and all information on contamination questions

The nation owes Marines and their families a safe, decent place to live.The Laurel Bay military housing community in Beaufort County fails that basic test in the eyes of a number of people who have lived there over the years.In a yearlong investigation, our staff documented their painful hardships. They think environmental factors at the 60-year-old complex of some 1,100 homes have contr...

The nation owes Marines and their families a safe, decent place to live.

The Laurel Bay military housing community in Beaufort County fails that basic test in the eyes of a number of people who have lived there over the years.

In a yearlong investigation, our staff documented their painful hardships. They think environmental factors at the 60-year-old complex of some 1,100 homes have contributed to a number of illnesses for Marines, their spouses and children.

Adults and children have battled cancer. Mothers have suffered through stillbirths, miscarriages and fertility issues. Others have reported serious respiratory, digestive and blood disorders.

The Marine Corps says there is no proven link between those health problems and environmental contamination at Laurel Bay. The state health department agrees.

But those on the front lines — the residents — are not so sure. One former resident posted online this January a YouTube video she called “Laurel Bay Housing and Kids with Cancer,” the floodgates opened.

As it turned out, many other families were worried — and sick.

An active civil suit may resolve some of their questions.

But one thing that is not in question is that the families living in Laurel Bay over the years were ill-informed by the military, which withheld details of a serious problem. Old heating-oil storage tanks buried in yards were linked to the presence of benzene, a known carcinogen; and naphthalene, a possible carcinogen.

Years and years went by in which families were told no details on the presence of carcinogens in the vicinity of their homes — where children played in the dirt and their parents planted gardens. We also found questions on whether all the underground tanks were truly filled with sand when they were no longer used, or still contained heating oil.

The military says there was no direct exposure to the contamination, especially since the homes are served by a public water system, not wells.

But we also now know that a powerful pesticide was applied outside Laurel Bay homes for seven years after it was banned in the U.S. because it was considered harmful to both human health and the environment.

Also, lead-based paint was found in homes, a childcare center and playgrounds.

And residents consistently raised concerns about mold in homes. Some said the response by property managers was insufficient.

Residents who raised questions felt silenced — one saying she was told by a property manager to quit spreading rumors as her family suffered. Others said they feared retaliation against their active-duty spouses if they rocked the boat.

The military needs to do more investigating, and be much more open with families living there now, and those who lived there in the past.

After the YouTube video was posted, the Marine Corps come forward with town hall meetings.

The Marine Corps should outline in detail what it has found at Laurel Bay — and when and where.

It should make sure everyone who has lived in Laurel Bay knows results of its most recent environmental studies.

If the Marine Corps will not demolish the old houses, scorch the earth and start anew, it should demolish its penchant of keeping vital information away from Marine families who are giving their all for the nation.

This story was originally published December 17, 2017 7:40 AM.

Marines say no tie between housing and children’s cancer. But is their study flawed?

Laurel Bay residents battle with leukemia, infertility and rare diseases. Is contamination the cause?Read more in this nine-part, special investigation by The Island Packet & The Beaufort Gazette.For years, some parents living on Laurel Bay quietly wondered why their children were diagnosed with cancer.In January, Amanda Whatley, the wife of a Marine and a former Laurel Bay resident, posted a YouTube video questioning if her daughter’s leukemia diagnosis stemmed from their stay on base from 2007 to 2010....

Laurel Bay residents battle with leukemia, infertility and rare diseases. Is contamination the cause?

Read more in this nine-part, special investigation by The Island Packet & The Beaufort Gazette.

For years, some parents living on Laurel Bay quietly wondered why their children were diagnosed with cancer.

In January, Amanda Whatley, the wife of a Marine and a former Laurel Bay resident, posted a YouTube video questioning if her daughter’s leukemia diagnosis stemmed from their stay on base from 2007 to 2010.

A brief excerpt of the more than 15 minute long YouTube video in which Amanda Whatley, a former resident of Beaufort's Laurel Bay, discusses findings of several children who were diagnosed with cancer illnesses - all of whom lived at the military By McClatchy

In an update posted with the video, Whatley said the number of known cases of Laurel Bay children diagnosed with cancer had grown to 13 and that she had heard from 20 adults who had been stationed in Beaufort and later diagnosed with cancer.

Suddenly, it seemed there might be an answer to the cancer question: the underground heating oil tanks buried beneath the yards of their Laurel Bay homes.

But a Marine Corps pediatric cancer study released in October found it “unlikely” — meaning there was “insufficient evidence” — that an environmental or occupational exposure was associated with the types of cancer identified among children of residents and former residents. In addition, the Corps’ study of soil and groundwater found no likely exposure pathway for contamination to reach residents of Laurel Bay.

Authors of the study confirmed 15 children’s cancer cases — one case shy of what they said was the National Cancer Institute’s minimum of 16 cases to calculate a valid ratio.

“In my experience, we’ve never been able to get enough cases to actually study,” said Dr. Chris Rennix, head of the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Epidata Center, which conducted Laurel Bay’s study.

However, a former director of a state cancer registry interviewed by The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette raised questions about the Corps’ findings. And an official with the National Cancer Institute partially disputed the Corps’ explanation for requiring 16 cases.

“(The National Cancer Institute) requires a minimum of 16 cases to calculate a valid ratio, but actually the minimum of 16 cases requirement is to protect the confidentiality of patients so fewer than 16 cases are suppressed in our data release. ... There is not a simple rule of thumb to guarantee stability of rates or rate ratios, which depends on specific problems,” the National Cancer Institute official, who asked not to be identified, told the newspapers in an email.

Richard Clapp, an epidemiologist that has conducted more than 40 cancer studies and is the former director of the Massachusetts Cancer Registry, said he has never heard of a 16-case requirement. He pointed to studies done on as few as five confirmed cases to calculate a rate.

“This type of analysis could have been used in the (Laurel Bay) study,” he said in an email to the newspapers. “With small numbers of cases, the standard error may be large and the 95 percent confidence interval may be wide, but that doesn’t mean you can’t do the calculation.”

The Corps’ study looked at five different types of cancer: Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), Neuroblastoma, soft issue sarcoma and Wilms tumor.

South Carolina’s own Cancer Registry, run by the Department of Health and Environmental Control, calls for at least five cases or deaths of a disease in a geographic area for statistical stability.

In a written response to the Packet and Gazette, the Corps said it could not rely on DHEC’s method because it found “no more than two cases of any type of cancer” diagnosed in the Beaufort study area, though it did not list how many cases of each type it had confirmed, citing patient privacy.

Given the Corps’ explanation, 10 cases should have been confirmed — two cases for each of the five diseases studied — but the study cited 15 confirmed cases.

At the newspapers’ request, Clapp reviewed the Corps’ explanation of its cancer study.

“My reaction is that if this response was submitted as a homework assignment in a course I was teaching, I’d give it a C-,” the Boston University professor emeritus said in an email.

Clapp served on a federal board that reviewed contamination at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in North Carolina — one of the most notorious examples of military contamination.

A more comprehensive look, Clapp said, would be a cohort study that looks at “everything diagnosable.” Following repeated pleas from Lejeune residents, this type of study was done on Lejeune by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A similar study could provide Laurel Bay residents with more reassurance, though Clapp acknowledged it’s more expensive and time-intensive.

Asked why the Laurel Bay study focused solely on pediatric cancer when scores of other residents reported illnesses, Rennix replied: “That wasn’t our question. So we can do the exact same thing with other illnesses, but that wasn’t the question we got. You could look at a zillion things and never make sense of anything, so you have to focus.”

How the study was done

The transience of the Laurel Bay community makes tracking medical conditions difficult. Residents are often stationed in Beaufort for a short time — a few months to a few years — and then move elsewhere.

The study originally identified 313 children with cancer who lived within a 30-mile radius around Laurel Bay and Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island from 2002 to 2016. Researchers found these children through a medical database, which included the children of active duty Marines across the country. However, it did not include Marine Corps members who have since left the service, a point some parents say downplays the findings.

Officials said that exclusion does not invalidate the results. Rather, they contend, the study’s purpose was to find the rate of childhood cancer, not to count the total number of children living on Laurel Bay who had developed cancer.

“As far as calculating a risk, we have to exclude people we can’t account for,” Rennix said.

He implied that part of the parental questioning surrounding cancer at Laurel Bay is tied to the military’s tight-knit atmosphere.

“There’s no secrets; they talk; one thing leads to another,” Rennix said. “A lot of times in adults, they’re talking and ‘Gosh I’ve got this cancer,’ and ‘I’ve got this cancer,’ and they start thinking about their recent exposures and that question comes up. Sometimes they’re satisfied; sometimes they’re not.”

Kelly Meyerhofer: 843-706-8136, @KellyMeyerhofer

Cancer concerns

Here's a sampling of emails from former Laurel Bay residents to Marine Corps officials about cancer concerns:

Response

Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center responds to critiques in their pediatric cancer study:

This story was originally published December 8, 2017 11:59 AM.

Halloween 2021: Ways to Celebrate

Family Fun at the Pumpkin Farm! Photo Credit: Peter MeltonCrystal Bay Farm at 40 Zils Road, between Watsonville and La Selva Beach, has a great variety of pumpkins, squash, Halloween fun, farm animals and more — plus live music on the weekends! Owners Jeff and Lori Fiorovich got the farm certified organic in 1997 and offer u-pick crops in season. Information: crystalbayfarm.com. Open every day 10-6.••• Halloween Activities in and around Santa Cruz CountyNo Tricks or ...

Family Fun at the Pumpkin Farm! Photo Credit: Peter Melton

Crystal Bay Farm at 40 Zils Road, between Watsonville and La Selva Beach, has a great variety of pumpkins, squash, Halloween fun, farm animals and more — plus live music on the weekends! Owners Jeff and Lori Fiorovich got the farm certified organic in 1997 and offer u-pick crops in season. Information: crystalbayfarm.com. Open every day 10-6.

••• Halloween Activities in and around Santa Cruz County

No Tricks or Treats At The Mall

Due to continuing COVID issues, the Capitola Mall will not be hosting trick or treating this year.

The mall is hosting a virtual costume contest with $50 gift cards as prizes. Visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ShopCapitolaMall for details.

••• Business Decorating Contest

The Aptos Chamber of Commerce is getting in the spirit with a Halloween decorating contest for local businesses.

Entry fee is a $25 minimum donation. The prize is 6 months of chamber advertising worth $500. To sign up, call 831-688-1467 or go to www.aptoschamber.com. Community voting is online through Oct. 31

••• October 19-31 Halloween Fun at the Wharf

The Santa Cruz Wharf will host 13 days of frightful fun. Great Pumpkin BINGO Hunt, snap a photo at scenic photo booth, and enjoy Wharf specials. Trick-o-Treating on the Wharf on Oct. 31 is from 3-6 p.m.

•• October 19 Halloween Snack Demo 4-5 p.m., Zoom class

Chef Brandon Miller will demonstrate — on behalf of Everyone’s Harvest Farmers’ Markets — how to make healthy Halloween snacks.

These include veggie skeletons made of broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, cucumber, celery, bell pepper, black olives, sugar snap peas, and cherry tomatoes, mandarin pumpkins, ghost eggs and guacamole with avocado skull.

He will provid the fat, carb, fiber and protein counts for each snack.

Join Chef Brandon Miller at https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89555496532?pwd=STJPam5abGVXbUZDN1lVZWluMEhnZz09

It’s free and open to everyone!

••• October 21 Evergreen At Dusk: Cemetery History Tours 4 – 7 p.m., Evergreen Cemetery, 261 Evergreen St., Santa Cruz.

Evergreen Cemetery is one of the oldest public cemeteries in California. The 45-minute tour uncovers the stories and tombstones of the people who made Santa Cruz what it is today.

Upon arrival, find the MAH table near the iconic Evergreen Arch. We will give you the printed map and guide with a brief introduction to Evergreen.

Following the welcome, you are then free to follow the scavenger hunt like map and travel back in time uncovering the stories buried across the grounds. Go at your own pace and begin your adventure.

Self-guided group tour $5, private group tour $40. MAH museum members get a discount and tickets at EventBrite.com sell out fast.

The private guided tour is led by a MAH staffer at 6 p.m. Thursdays and available to two households per night.

••• October 22-23 / 26-30 19th Annual Scotts Valley High Haunted House

This walk-though haunted experience is presented by students at Scotts Valley High School to benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. It’s recommended for children 10 and up plus adults.

The 2021 theme is: Camp Schmetterling. Tickets are $10 and are sold at the gate of the school, 555 Glenwood Drive, Scotts Valley — they are not sold in advance. Get inline early!

There could be wait of more than an hour to buy tickets. Questions can be emailed in advance to https://svhaunt.org/public/contact.html to be answered.

••• October 23 Creepy Carnival at Laurel Park

Mask-making and a child-friendly Big Top Performance in Laurel Park in Santa Cruz. Free entry, 12-4 p.m. Big Top Performance at 2 p.m. FREE

Scarier version of Big Top show, not recommended for kids under 12, from 6-8 p.m., admission $5

••• October 23-24 Glass Pumpkin Patch Live Oak Grange, 1900 17th Ave., Santa Cruz

The 2021 Live Oak Glass Pumpkin Patch is on! It takes place one weekend only, outdoors in the heirloom orchard of the Live Oak Grange, with plenty of fresh air and room for social distancing.

Come see the creative ideas that Chris Johnson and the team have come up with this year.

To preview his work, visit www.chrisjohnsonglass.com. Or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/ClayandGlass.

••• October 28 Family Costume Roller Party

The Downtown Association will host a Costume Roller Party on the parking lot roof deck located at the corner of Walnut Ave., Cedar and Church Streets in Santa Cruz.

Bring your own skates, blades, boards and scooters, plus beach chairs for comfort. No admission thanks to local sponsors.

••• October 29 Halloween Horrors Film Competition

Check out films from local Santa Cruz filmmakers in the London Nelson Community Center’s Halloween Horrors Film Competition.

View films in the categories of Original Horror Short and Horror Film Scene Remake at nelsoncenter.com and click on the Halloween Experience link to view entries and vote for your favorites.

••• October 29 Haunted Halloween at Cabrillo College 12:30 p.m., Samper Recital Hall

Be prepared for a spooky time in the Samper Recital Hall as all areas of the music department join forces to present our annual Haunted Halloween show.

Costumes recommended! Visit www.cabrillo.edu/vapa/2021-10-29-haunted-halloween/ for more information.

••• October 29 Spookacular at the YMCA 5:30-8 p.m., Watsonville YMCA, 27 Sudden St, Watsonville

All locations of the Central Coast YMCA will offer chills and thrills during the Halloween season with its Spooktacular 2021 this October, including the Watsonville YMCA the Friday before Halloween.

Spooktacular events feature trick-or-treat stations, haunted house, arts & crafts, costume parade and more fun for the whole family, all free to the community.

For more information, call the Watsonville branch at (831) 728-9622 or go to centralcoastymca.org.

••• October 30 Día de los Muertos Celebration Evergreen Cemetery, 261 Evergreen St, Santa Cruz

The Día de los Muertos community celebration of traditional music, dance, and art at Evergreen Cemetery in Santa Cruz will take place all day.

There will be live performances by Senderos’ Centeotl Danza y Baile and Ensamble Musical de Senderos, altars honoring those buried at Evergreen Cemetery created by local community organizations and members.

If you wish to build an altar sharing your tradition and story of your loved one, you can do so.

Recordando Recuerdos translates to remembering memories and will be a community-sourced piece honoring life, death, and loss. This community piece began in 2020 as the pandemic crisis significantly more visible. It was a reminder of the power of collective mourning and care.

You are invited to share your story on a collaborative artwork made of vibrant colors with names of loved ones, objects, and moments lost that you wish to honor and remember.

Visit www.santacruzmah.org/events/diadelosmuertos-2021/2021/10/30 to learn more and to fill out the forms to share your stories.

Recordando Recuerdos will be displayed at the Dia de los Muertos at Evergreen Cemetery on Oct. 30, then hung above the community ofrenda in the MAH atrium from Oct. 31-Nov. 4.

Contact Helen Aldana (they/them/theirs) at helen@santacruzmah.org or leave a voice message at 831.429.1964 ext. 7032 for a call back.

This event will be monitored by MAH staff so guests can comfortably browse the art safely and comfortably. Signage and markers will show designated paths and distance for a safe experience.

Do your part to keep these events safe by abiding by these guidelines and listening to MAH staffers. If you have questions about precautions being taken, email info@santacruzmah.org.

Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History: 705 Front St., Santa Cruz.

••• October 31 SC Harbor Witches Annual Gathering

Grab your witches, ghouls, goblins, and come jump on an SUP board at the Santa Cruz Harbor and lets go scaring!

Join the SUP Shack for our 10th Annual Halloween Paddle, where we bewitch the locals and have general shenanigans on this witchly day at the Santa Cruz Harbor.

Get in touch with your inner witch — or gremlin — and have some fun.

$35 per person for 1 hour rental of the SUP. All proceeds will go to Second Harvest Food Bank. Feeding Santa Cruz! Call (831) 464-7467 for more info.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.