Orthodontist in Ladys Island, SC

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A smile is such a simple thing, but it can hold so much power. Smiling is universally considered to be a way that humans display joy. Smiles communicate to others how we’re feeling and are often the best way to break the ice when meeting a new person. A good-natured smile can work wonders, but if you’re like most folks, your smile may not be perfect. Every day, we hear stories from people who feel embarrassed, ashamed, or even scared to flash their smile. In fact, 75% of prospective orthodontic patients could benefit from straighter teeth. Thankfully, Winning Orthodontic Smiles offers affordable orthodontic solutions that give our patients a healthier mouth, more self-esteem, and more confidence.

At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, your smile is our passion. Our orthodontists and hygienists are dedicated to providing you with the best orthodontic care possible in a stress-free, comfortable setting. We know what a difference a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to giving our clients a winning smile they love.

Having served the Lowcountry for more than 30 years, we know that no two patients have the exact orthodontic needs. That’s why we offer a variety of treatment options to correct each patient’s unique concerns, along with payment plans that make braces affordable for every family. You can rest easy knowing that our team specializes in the latest innovations in the field of orthodontics. This allows us to treat our patients in the most efficient, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing ways possible.

A few of our orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina include:
  • Invisalign®
  • Invisalign® Teen
  • Clear Braces
  • Traditional Braces
  • Early Treatment
  • Adult Treatment

If you’re looking for an orthodontist in Ladys Island, SC, who is professional, trustworthy, and compassionate, look no further than Winning Orthodontic Smiles. Your pathway to a beautiful smile starts by selecting the orthodontic treatment option best suited for your needs.

Service Area

Invisalign Treatment

Invisalign® Treatment in Ladys Island, SC

Over the last few years, Invisalign® has become one of the most popular and effective orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina. For those looking for a convenient, comfortable, discreet way to realign their teeth, Invisalign® should be on your shortlist.

What Is Invisalign®?

Invisalign® is a treatment used by orthodontists in Ladys Island that straightens patients’ teeth without traditional braces. Invisalign® works using a succession of custom trays that cover your teeth, which gently pull them into proper alignment over time. Each custom tray brings your teeth closer to their final position. Treatment times vary depending on how severe your case is but typically don’t last longer than two years. Once treatment is complete, you may need a retainer for the longest-lasting results.

Since they are clear, most patients find Invisalign® less noticeable than traditional braces. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign® can be removed while eating, meaning patients don’t have to worry about damaging their trays with certain foods. Invisalign® is great for people of all ages and has become a top choice for teens and adults alike.

Invisalign® works well for patients who have:
  • Crooked teeth
  • Gapped or spaced teeth
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Overbites, Underbites, and Crossbites

How Does Invisalign® Work?

Invisalign® works for most patients in a three-step process:
Initial Consultation

Initial Consultation

You will meet with your Invisalign orthodontist in Ladys Island, SC. During this consultation, your doctor will take a 3D digital scan of your teeth. From there, they will put together a comprehensive treatment plan customized to your needs. The best part? Before you leave, they will give you a sneak peek at your new smile using an innovative scanner.

First Fitting

First Fitting

During this step, your orthodontist will make sure that your custom aligners fit correctly. If you have any questions, this is the perfect time to ask. Before you leave, your doctor will let you know what to expect over the coming weeks and months. Treatment completion times will vary for patients, but you should see early results in just a few weeks. During this, you will check in regularly with your orthodontist.

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile – Once your treatment is complete, it’s time to show off your new smile to as many people as possible! Be sure to ask your orthodontist if you will need to use a retainer to keep your teeth straight over the long haul. The last thing you want is for your teeth to shift gradually back into their original positions.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces – Which is Right for You?

With so many great teeth straightening options available today, it can be hard to settle on a treatment choice. One of the most common questions we get revolves around which treatment is better: Invisalign® or traditional braces? The answer to that question is nuanced since every patient will have different needs. A younger patient with slightly crooked teeth might benefit from the discreet features of Invisalign®. On the other hand, an older patient with a severe underbite might benefit more from the reliability of traditional braces.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces–Which is Right for You?
Keep in mind the following highlights, which will help you remain informed when doing your research:
Are They Removable? Invisalign® trays can be removed. Traditional braces cannon.
  • Treatment-Length-icon

    Treatment Length

    Invisalign® treatment can last anywhere from six months to two years. Treatment times for traditional braces can last from one to three years. Each time frame can vary depending on the patient’s individual case.

  • Orthodontic-Visits

    Orthodontic Visits:

    With Invisalign®, patients visit their Invisalign dentist in Ladys Island, SC, every three months. With traditional braces, patients can expect to visit every month or every other month.

  • Cleaning-icon

    Cleaning

    Regular brushing and flossing is recommended for patients using Invisalign®. A specialized floss threading tool and regular brushing and flossing are recommended for patients with traditional braces.

  • Benefits

    Benefits

    Invisalign® is discrete, comfortable, can be removed, and doesn’t require any food restrictions. Traditional braces offer consistent progress, are effective for severe cases, have time-tested reliability, and can be a good choice for cost-conscious shoppers.

Ready to learn more about Invisalign® in Ladys Island, SC? Give our office a call, and we would be happy to get you scheduled for your first consultation.

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Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Are you craving a beautiful smile but feel that you’re too old for braces? You wouldn’t be the only adult to have that thought. However, the truth is that 25% of our orthodontic patients are now adults. At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, you’re never too old for braces!

We want you to know that a healthy, stunning smile is attainable no matter what age you are. Our orthodontist in Ladys Island, SC, offers several treatments that are perfect for working adults and can help you decide if braces are right. If you decide that adult braces are the way to go, we have a number of options for you to consider. From traditional metal braces that offer time-tested results to more discreet options like Invisalign®, your new smile is more attainable than you might think. During your initial visit with our doctor, we will review all of your treatment options and help you choose the one you need for optimal results.

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Benefits of Adult Braces

Most patients understand that a straighter smile is more aesthetic; however, not everyone knows that properly aligned teeth can improve your oral health. Here are just a few reasons why so many adults are optimizing their oral health with adult braces:

Benefits-of-Adult-Braces
More Confidence

More Confidence

If you’re feeling self-conscious about how your teeth look, you’re not alone. Millions of adults around the U.S. aren’t happy with the way that their oral aesthetics. Adult braces help restore your confidence and can give you a smile that you’re proud to show off. When you like the way your teeth look, you’ll be more likely to smile. This simple act makes you feel happier, reduces stress, and can improve your mental health. Plus, it makes people around you feel great too.

Less Bad Breath

Less Bad Breath

Few things are as nasty as speaking to someone with bad breath. We’ve all been there, but it is never any less embarrassing when someone tries to subtlety offer you a mint for your breath. What most folks don’t know is that misaligned teeth and bad breath are often connected. That’s because when your teeth are crooked or over-crowded, bacteria can find their way in between your teeth. This is an area that most toothbrushes can’t reach. With time, that bacteria builds up, and your breath begins to stink. When left unchecked, these bacteria can cause serious health problems.

Better Oral Health

Better Oral Health

When you have poor oral health, there are a number of health risks that should concern you. Misaligned teeth can cause bacteria to build up. Over time, harmful bacteria cause serious problems like cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease. Thankfully, orthodontic treatment can help you avoid severe tooth decay, gum recession, and bone loss. You can even reduce and prevent irregular tooth enamel loss pain associated with TMJ and TMD.

Enjoy More Foods

Enjoy More Foods

If you have never had a major problem with your teeth, you might not know that eating can be painful if you have misaligned teeth. This causes some patients to avoid foods that cause them pain. Adult braces can straighten your teeth and correct over and underbites for patients with severely crooked or crowded teeth. When you don’t have to worry about painful chewing or biting, you can experience the full joy of eating a delicious meal.

Improved Speech

Improved Speech

Having crooked teeth can make you feel self-conscious about your smile, but they can also affect how you pronounce certain words. If you’re having problems pronouncing words because your teeth are severely misaligned, adult braces can change your life. This is especially true for working professionals who speak publicly, take part in Zoom calls, and work over the phone. If this sounds like you, speak to our trusted Invisalign orthodontist in Ladys Island, SC, about discreet ways to improve your oral health and speech at the same time.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

Your child’s early and teen years are a great time to consider orthodontic treatment. According to The American Association of Orthodontists, the optimal time for a child to receive their first orthodontic treatment is by age seven. When you treat your child for braces early, you have the opportunity to discover and correct oral issues before they become serious. Doing so gives your child a leg-up on their peers and saves you time and money in the long run.

The overall goal of early orthodontic treatment is to intercept the possible issue, eliminate the cause, oversee facial and jawbone growth, and make sure there is enough space for adult teeth. Depending on how your child’s teeth develop, they may need a second course of treatment after their permanent teeth have formed.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

A few common orthodontic problems that may require treatment for children include:

  • Crossbites – this happens when your child’s jaw shifts to one side.
  • Underbites – this occurs when your child’s front lower teeth are ahead of their front upper teeth.
  • Excessively spaced teeth
  • Extremely crowded teeth
  • Extra teeth
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth that do not meet properly or don’t meet at all
  • Pacifier, finger, or thumb-sucking that affects your child’s jaw or teeth growth

The best way to learn whether your child will need early treatment is to speak with your orthodontist in Ladys Island, SC. Dr. Travis, Dr. Katie, and Dr. Gavin are trained to spot subtle problems, even in young children. During your child’s initial consultation, you can expect one of three outcomes:

  • There is a problem that early orthodontic treatment may correct.
  • Treatment may be necessary in the future. We’ll keep an eye on your child’s oral health while their face and jaw matures.
  • There is no treatment necessary at this stage.

Latest News in Ladys Island

What’s up with Publix planned for Beaufort? What we know about upgrades to plaza

A major improvement planned at an aging Beaufort shopping center has begun with a project expected to spark additional investment in the vicinity.There’s still no word, however, on when construction will start on the Publix grocery store that will anchor Beaufort Plaza at Robert Smalls Parkway and Boundary Street.“Unfortunately, the start and completion dates for this 48,000 square-foot store located in Beaufort Plaza has yet to be announced,” Chris Norberg, a Jacksonville-based spokesman for Publix Super Mark...

A major improvement planned at an aging Beaufort shopping center has begun with a project expected to spark additional investment in the vicinity.

There’s still no word, however, on when construction will start on the Publix grocery store that will anchor Beaufort Plaza at Robert Smalls Parkway and Boundary Street.

“Unfortunately, the start and completion dates for this 48,000 square-foot store located in Beaufort Plaza has yet to be announced,” Chris Norberg, a Jacksonville-based spokesman for Publix Super Markets Inc., said Monday.

The city previously said the grocery store was expected to open in the fall of 2021.

Paul Trask, the developer, did not respond to a request for comment.

Dave Prichard, the city’s director of Community and Economic Development, said the city has not issued a construction permit for Publix but will as soon as the developer hires a general contractor and pays for the permit, Prichard said.

Beaufort already has issued permits for site and facade work, and on Monday, backhoes were digging and moving dirt at the site.

The addition of the Publix store is just one aspect of a larger plan to upgrade the appearance of storefronts and make other plaza improvements, Prichard noted.

Stores already in the plaza include the U.S. Postal Service office, Burke’s outlet, Staples, Big Lots and Aaron’s computer, appliances, furniture and electronics store.

Upgrades are scheduled at each of the storefronts, including resurfacing sidewalks, painting facades, installing new LED lights and replacing signs.

New “liner” stores, which will line Robert Smalls Parkway and Boundary Street, also are planned. Store names have not been announced, said Prichard, noting that plans also call for re-configuring the parking lot.

Work that’s allowed now includes landscaping, lighting changes, facade work and installing pads for the “liner” buildings, Prichard said.

The new Publix store will be on the southeast section of the plaza, to the rear of a movie theater that was demolished.

Changes at the shopping center follow the $33-million Boundary Street redevelopment project completed in 2018 and meant to make one of the city’s main thoroughfares more welcoming and spur development in the area.

The plaza improvements will encourage additional investment, Prichard said.

“On balance, it’s going to be good for the city, and it’s also going to be good for that part of city,” Prichard said.

Publix will be the second new grocery store in the area, and a third is planned.

Doors opened at a new Food Lion grocery April 21 at 2127 Boundary St. It took the place of a BI-LO and is less than a mile from the Beaufort Plaza.

Harris Teeter is pursuing a new grocery store plus a convenience store and gas station at 163 Sea Island Parkway on Lady’s Island. It is planning to build on a site vacated by Publix for a new store on the other side of Sea Island Parkway.

The Beaufort Design Review Board signed off on the Harris Teeter plans Jan. 21, but the city hasn’t given final approval.

South of the Broad River, a new Publix near the S.C. 170 traffic circle in Bluffton opened in March.

9 Beaufort County schools will have new principals. Here’s what you should know.

Nine Beaufort County School District campuses will have new principals next year, superintendent Frank Rodriguez announced Wednesday.Beaufort Elementary, M.C. Riley Elementary, Mossy Oaks Elementary, Whale Branch Elementary, Lady’s Island Elementary, Robert Smalls International Academy, H.E. McCracken Middle, Hilton Head Island Middle and Battery Creek High School will have new faces in the principal’s office in the fall.The district also will be selecting new principals for Whale Branch Early College High School an...

Nine Beaufort County School District campuses will have new principals next year, superintendent Frank Rodriguez announced Wednesday.

Beaufort Elementary, M.C. Riley Elementary, Mossy Oaks Elementary, Whale Branch Elementary, Lady’s Island Elementary, Robert Smalls International Academy, H.E. McCracken Middle, Hilton Head Island Middle and Battery Creek High School will have new faces in the principal’s office in the fall.

The district also will be selecting new principals for Whale Branch Early College High School and Whale Branch Middle School in early July, according to a district press release.

Seven of the new principals previously served as assistant principals or principals elsewhere in the district, while two come from outside the district.

? M.C. Riley Elementary School: Melissa Holland, who has served as the principal of Beaufort Elementary School since 2015, will be the new principal. She’s replacing Adrienne Sutton, who is retiring after 30 years with the district.

Holland has been with the district for more than 20 years, serving as a teacher at Hilton Head Island Elementary School and assistant principal at Bluffton, Lady’s Island, and Beaufort elementary schools. She holds a two master’s degrees in Early Childhood Education and Educational Administration from the University of South Carolina.

? Beaufort Elementary: Michelle Sackman will replace Holland as principal. She has been the principal at Mossy Oaks Elementary since 2017. Sackman has also been with the district for more than 20 years, and currently serves as a curriculum writer and facilitator for the S.C. Department of Education. She holds a master’s degree in Education Leadership from Capella University.

? Mossy Oaks Elementary: Melissa Vogt is taking over for Sackman at Mossy Oaks Elementary. Vogt has been the principal of Whale Branch Elementary School since 2018. She taught at M.C. Riley Elementary School at the beginning of her 20-plus year career with the district and has served as an assistant principal at Bluffton, Broad River and Red Cedar elementary schools. She holds a master’s degree in Education Leadership from Georgia Southern University.

? Whale Branch Elementary: Marva Neal will move from an assistant principal job at Okatie Elementary, where she has worked since 2011, to replace Vogt at Whale Branch Elementary. Neal began her career with the United States Air Force, serving as an information manager and air cargo specialist. She has been with the district for more than 20 years and has held positions at St. Helena and Okatie elementary schools.

She earned a master’s degree in Educational Administration from the University of South Carolina, and she holds two additional master’s degrees from Lesley University in Technology in Education and Curriculum and Instruction.

? Lady’s Island Elementary: Davina Coleman is the new principal of Lady’s Island Elementary School. She has served as an assistant principal at Robert Smalls International Academy since 2018 and is replacing Marvelle Ulmer, who is retiring after a decade as principal.

Coleman began her educational career as a math teacher in Hawaii and has held positions at Beaufort Middle School and Robert Smalls International Academy. She holds a master’s degree in Education in Administration from the University of South Carolina.

? Robert Smalls International Academy: Bradley Tarrance is the new principal of Robert Smalls International Academy. He previously served as a principal in Grand Rapids, Mich. for Godwin Heights Public Schools. He’s replacing Celeste LaVan, who was named an executive director for the district.

Tarrance has 20-plus years in education, having served as a middle school language arts teacher and principal of two turn-around middle schools in San Antonio, Texas. He holds a master’s degree in Education Leadership from Trinity University in San Antonio.

? H.E. McCracken Middle School: Ryan Milling will be the principal at H.E. McCracken Middle School, where he has served as an assistant principal for the past year. He’s replacing Lindsey Skirtich, who is taking a job in the private sector.

Milling began his educational career as a school counselor and held positions in Darlington, Fort Mill and Florence School District Three before coming to Beaufort County in 2020. He holds master’s degrees in Educational Leadership and Counseling and Development, both from Winthrop University.

? Hilton Head Island Middle School: Tanja Wheeler will be the new principal, replacing Patricia Freda, who is retiring after more than 35 years in education. Wheeler has been an educator for more than 30 years and served as principal at Nacel International School Systems and Future International School. Wheeler holds a doctorate degree in Educational Leadership and Management from Capella University.

? Battery Creek High School: Denise Lessard will be the principal of Battery Creek High School, where she has been an assistant principal since 2017. She’s replacing Chad Cox, who was promoted to an executive director position with the district.

Lessard has worked in education for more than 30 years, starting as a teacher in New Hampshire before coming to Beaufort County in 2015 as a social studies teacher at Whale Branch Early College High School and an instructional coach at Battery Creek High. She holds a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in Educational Leadership from Plymouth State University.

This story was originally published July 1, 2021 4:55 AM.

Beaufort Co. school board reprimands member after he sues board, district for defamation

Beaufort County school board members publicly reprimanded one of its members Tuesday evening for the second time in a year.The board voted 8-1-2 to “publicly express its disapproval” of William Smith, the board’s Lady’s Island and St. Helena representative since 2019, for violating board policies on conduct. His colleagues specifically criticized him for trying to resolve school issues without involving Superintendent Frank Rodriguez or the rest of the board.David Striebinger, the board’s secretary...

Beaufort County school board members publicly reprimanded one of its members Tuesday evening for the second time in a year.

The board voted 8-1-2 to “publicly express its disapproval” of William Smith, the board’s Lady’s Island and St. Helena representative since 2019, for violating board policies on conduct. His colleagues specifically criticized him for trying to resolve school issues without involving Superintendent Frank Rodriguez or the rest of the board.

David Striebinger, the board’s secretary, made the motion to reprimand Smith coming out of closed session. Smith voted “no.” Angela Middleton and Mel Campbell abstained.

Striebinger listed the following board policies he said Smith had violated:

He added that Smith had violated the district’s Administrative Rule E-13 on school visits, which requires visitors to go to the front office and get authorization from the principal before going anywhere else in the building.

In October 2020, the board voted to publicly reprimand Smith for violating a board policy that says members cannot make official visits to schools without notifying the school’s principal.

Smith has sued Beaufort County School District, the school board, board chairperson Christina Gwozdz, board member Richard Geier, former interim superintendent Herbert Berg and district chief of security David Grissom.

In the June 7 lawsuit, he alleged that the defendants slandered him and conducted “a concerted smear campaign” in 2019 after at least four employees filed complaints against him, claiming he “created a hostile work environment” by making unannounced visits to their office. (The defendants in that lawsuit responded to Smith’s claims on June 29, calling the suit “starkly self-serving” and asking for all of his claims to be dismissed.)

Smith said Tuesday that because of his pending lawsuit, his attorney advised him to not speak about the grievances until he had “sufficient time” to review a report made to the board by their attorney, Andrea White, and to “conduct my own investigation into the incident.”

He asked the board to postpone its vote on reprimanding him until the next meeting; the board voted 5-6 against postponing, with board chairperson Christina Gwozdz saying Smith and his attorney Maureen Coffey “have had more than 30 days to respond to this.”

Columbia-based attorney White was hired by the board in August “to investigate a grievance filed by a District employee against a Trustee.” Smith was the lone “no” vote on her hiring; she also represented the board in the 2019 grievances filed against Smith.

The school board has not named the subject of the August complaint or discussed the nature of the complaint. These complaints can encompass any form of work grievance, ranging from discrimination to a hostile environment to violations of the law.

Pro athletes and celebrities use this Beaufort airport. Why it’s being discovered

This story, originally published Oct. 3, 2021, has been updated to correct the length of the runway, which is 3,400 feet, and the name of the flight school, which is Beaufort Flight Training. Rocking chairs sit on a porch at the Beaufort Executive Airport, where pilots or anybody from the public can sit and watch airplanes come and go.“A lot of people don’t know it’s here,” says Beaufort County airports director Jonathan Rembold of the small publicly run airport on Lady’s Island.The a...

This story, originally published Oct. 3, 2021, has been updated to correct the length of the runway, which is 3,400 feet, and the name of the flight school, which is Beaufort Flight Training.

Rocking chairs sit on a porch at the Beaufort Executive Airport, where pilots or anybody from the public can sit and watch airplanes come and go.

“A lot of people don’t know it’s here,” says Beaufort County airports director Jonathan Rembold of the small publicly run airport on Lady’s Island.

The anonymity of the slow-placed airstrip is changing fast. In the past nine months alone, the airport has tracked 6,000 non-local users of its lone 3,400-foot runway for business and pleasure. Some of those passing through were first-time visitors to the Lowcountry and chose to put down roots based on what they saw.

The out-of-the-way airport in northern Beaufort County is used by pro athletes and celebrities trying to avoid the spotlight, fishermen and hunters, hobby pilots and business people and doctors who fly rather than drive to make sales calls or perform surgeries.

The discovery of the airstrip by pilots from outside of the Lowcountry hasn’t been an accident.

South Carolina is a good place to refuel for pilots flying from New England to Florida. A year ago, airport officials decided to see if a fuel price reduction would catch their attention. It did. Fuel sales doubled, a clear indication more pilots were touching down in Beaufort County.

In addition, in November, the airport began marketing the facility as Beaufort Executive Airport, with “county” dropped to attract more business clientele. Locals have long known the airport colloquially as Frogmore Intranational.

On top of those two in changes, COVID-19 pandemic hit in March 2020, and airport officials say that drove up use, too, with more people flying their own planes or chartering them rather than flying commercial.

One day this week, Paul Dolin, supervisor of the airport off of Sea Island Parkway across from the Walmart, sped down around the airport in a four-wheeled cart, pointing out its features including 34 hangars that are full. An additional 13 airplanes are parked outside. There are 50 people on a hangar waiting list.

“If I could build 50 hangars tomorrow, I’d fill up 50 hangars tomorrow,” Dolin says.

Dolin is the sole full-time employee of the airport, overseeing three part-time employees. Beaufort Executive is one of two airports Beaufort County operates. While Hilton Head Airport offers commercial flights, the 110-acre Beaufort Executive is a general aviation airport offering aircraft servicing and fueling for smaller aircraft flown for recreational or business purposes.

Beaufort Flight Training, a flight school, is based here. And the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office has a hangar here where it keeps law enforcement aircraft, as does Mosquito Control. Deputy airports director Steve Parry notes that airport officials sometimes take complaints about low-flying aircraft. More often than not, he says, it’s a plane spraying for mosquitoes, which changes the complaints to cheers.

“It happened really quickly by word of mouth,” Rembold said of increased use of Beaufort Executive.

He also credits top-notch customer service for the uptick. Airport employees, for example, send pilots and passengers to local restaurants, hoping they will enjoy as much of Beaufort as they can during their brief stays.

“We don’t have a fee for being a concierge, but that’s what we do,” Rembold said.

Plans are in place to spruce up the lobby so the tourists have an improved first impression.

Within the next 30 days, $80,000 will be spent to remodel the lobby of the terminal using hospitality tax funds. The airport was built in the 1950s, and the land was once part of the Eustis cotton plantation.

“We want to make it look nice so people have a nice place to enter and exit when they visit,” Parry said.

Those improvements will follow on the heels of a $1 million upgrade of the airport’s runway lights in 2019. They were damaged during flooding caused by hurricanes Matthew and Irma. An FAA grant covered the cost of the work.

It’s not unusual to see celebrities or professional athletes at the local airport. PGA golfers, for example, use it to reach the region before and after the RBC Heritage tournament on Hilton Head. Golfers playing Secession Golf Club in Beaufort fly in sometimes, too. Parry, however, wouldn’t name names.

“I can imagine for them, it’s a nice getaway,” Parry said.

Beaufort Executive Airport, located at 39 Airport Circle on Lady’s Island, will host a 5K and an open house on Saturday, Oct. 9.

The open house is from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. It will feature a welcome tent with exhibitors, aircraft displays on the tarmac, and a WWII vintage aircraft.

The Run the Runway 5K for runners and walkers starts at 7:30 a.m. Sign up for the run at www.beaufortcountyairport.com or call 843-962-2142.

This story was originally published October 3, 2021 5:00 AM.

COVID-19 cases rise among Beaufort Co. kids; schools report 100+ infections in 3 days

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Almost a quarter of Beaufort County’s new COVID-19 cases last week were recorded among kids aged 11 to 20, according to a Thursday analysis of data from the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

About 13.2% of infections, meanwhile, were among children younger than 10, DHEC data show.

Only 1.9% of cases were identified in people 81 or older.

In comparison, from Aug. 15 to 21, about 20.1% of infections were among the 11-20 age group; 12.3% of cases were reported among children under the age of 10; and 2.7% of cases were discovered among those 81 or older.

The Thursday analysis shows that, during the Lowcountry’s ongoing wave of delta variant cases, kids and teenagers have been particularly affected.

The recent countywide numbers also have coincided with the start of K-12 classes this fall.

The Beaufort County School District has already reported thousands of COVID-19 quarantines and hundreds of cases among students and staff.

“Since Aug. 21, the 11-20 age group has recorded the highest number of new cases in South Carolina,” added Dr. Jonathan Knoche, a medical consultant at the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, during a Wednesday briefing with reporters.

“If you go back to earlier this summer, for the week of June 12 to the 19, the 11- to 20-year-old age group accounted for 173 cases statewide. This past week, in comparison, that group accounted for 7,713 cases.”

Between Monday and Wednesday, BCSD reported 107 new COVID-19 cases — 97 among students and 10 among staff, according to district spokesperson Candace Bruder. She said that Bluffton Middle School, Lady’s Island Middle School and Red Cedar Elementary School had the highest rate of new infections in that timeframe.

In a Monday night email, Bluffton Middle School Principal Matt Hall told parents that the school “has had to begin quarantining entire classrooms.”

“If we continue to see a rise in Covid cases in our school, we will need to quarantine our ENTIRE school for at least two weeks and move to 100% online learning,” Hall wrote, adding that he was “highly encouraging masks in our school building.”

In total, the district has logged 541 cases since school began on Aug. 16.

Between Monday and Wednesday, 2,489 students and 45 staff members were actively quarantining. That’s about one in every nine of the district’s 21,500 students.

Bruder said nurses update the district’s COVID-19 case and quarantine counts throughout the day, meaning those reported numbers could be lower now than the actual total of new infections and active quarantines.

Here are the latest Beaufort County coronavirus data from DHEC:

New cases reported Thursday: 126 confirmed, 9 probable

New deaths reported Thursday: 2 confirmed

Seven-day average of new cases: 141 confirmed infections per day

Two-week incidence rate: 1,303 cases per 100,000 people

Bluffton ZIP code, 29910: 1,760 cases since July 1

Hilton Head Island ZIP code, 29926: 654 cases

Hilton Head ZIP code, 29928: 257 cases

Beaufort ZIP code, 29902: 807 cases

Okatie ZIP code, 29909: 396 cases

This story was originally published September 2, 2021 2:05 PM.

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