Orthodontist in Attaway, SC

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A smile is such a simple thing, but it can hold so much power. Smiling is universally considered to be a way that humans display joy. Smiles communicate to others how we’re feeling and are often the best way to break the ice when meeting a new person. A good-natured smile can work wonders, but if you’re like most folks, your smile may not be perfect. Every day, we hear stories from people who feel embarrassed, ashamed, or even scared to flash their smile. In fact, 75% of prospective orthodontic patients could benefit from straighter teeth. Thankfully, Winning Orthodontic Smiles offers affordable orthodontic solutions that give our patients a healthier mouth, more self-esteem, and more confidence.

At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, your smile is our passion. Our orthodontists and hygienists are dedicated to providing you with the best orthodontic care possible in a stress-free, comfortable setting. We know what a difference a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to giving our clients a winning smile they love.

Having served the Lowcountry for more than 30 years, we know that no two patients have the exact orthodontic needs. That’s why we offer a variety of treatment options to correct each patient’s unique concerns, along with payment plans that make braces affordable for every family. You can rest easy knowing that our team specializes in the latest innovations in the field of orthodontics. This allows us to treat our patients in the most efficient, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing ways possible.

A few of our orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina include:
  • Invisalign®
  • Invisalign® Teen
  • Clear Braces
  • Traditional Braces
  • Early Treatment
  • Adult Treatment

If you’re looking for an orthodontist in Attaway, SC, who is professional, trustworthy, and compassionate, look no further than Winning Orthodontic Smiles. Your pathway to a beautiful smile starts by selecting the orthodontic treatment option best suited for your needs.

Service Area

Invisalign Treatment

Invisalign® Treatment in Attaway, SC

Over the last few years, Invisalign® has become one of the most popular and effective orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina. For those looking for a convenient, comfortable, discreet way to realign their teeth, Invisalign® should be on your shortlist.

What Is Invisalign®?

Invisalign® is a treatment used by orthodontists in Attaway that straightens patients’ teeth without traditional braces. Invisalign® works using a succession of custom trays that cover your teeth, which gently pull them into proper alignment over time. Each custom tray brings your teeth closer to their final position. Treatment times vary depending on how severe your case is but typically don’t last longer than two years. Once treatment is complete, you may need a retainer for the longest-lasting results.

Since they are clear, most patients find Invisalign® less noticeable than traditional braces. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign® can be removed while eating, meaning patients don’t have to worry about damaging their trays with certain foods. Invisalign® is great for people of all ages and has become a top choice for teens and adults alike.

Invisalign® works well for patients who have:
  • Crooked teeth
  • Gapped or spaced teeth
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Overbites, Underbites, and Crossbites

How Does Invisalign® Work?

Invisalign® works for most patients in a three-step process:
Initial Consultation

Initial Consultation

You will meet with your Invisalign orthodontist in Attaway, SC. During this consultation, your doctor will take a 3D digital scan of your teeth. From there, they will put together a comprehensive treatment plan customized to your needs. The best part? Before you leave, they will give you a sneak peek at your new smile using an innovative scanner.

First Fitting

First Fitting

During this step, your orthodontist will make sure that your custom aligners fit correctly. If you have any questions, this is the perfect time to ask. Before you leave, your doctor will let you know what to expect over the coming weeks and months. Treatment completion times will vary for patients, but you should see early results in just a few weeks. During this, you will check in regularly with your orthodontist.

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile – Once your treatment is complete, it’s time to show off your new smile to as many people as possible! Be sure to ask your orthodontist if you will need to use a retainer to keep your teeth straight over the long haul. The last thing you want is for your teeth to shift gradually back into their original positions.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces – Which is Right for You?

With so many great teeth straightening options available today, it can be hard to settle on a treatment choice. One of the most common questions we get revolves around which treatment is better: Invisalign® or traditional braces? The answer to that question is nuanced since every patient will have different needs. A younger patient with slightly crooked teeth might benefit from the discreet features of Invisalign®. On the other hand, an older patient with a severe underbite might benefit more from the reliability of traditional braces.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces–Which is Right for You?
Keep in mind the following highlights, which will help you remain informed when doing your research:
Are They Removable? Invisalign® trays can be removed. Traditional braces cannon.
  • Treatment-Length-icon

    Treatment Length

    Invisalign® treatment can last anywhere from six months to two years. Treatment times for traditional braces can last from one to three years. Each time frame can vary depending on the patient’s individual case.

  • Orthodontic-Visits

    Orthodontic Visits:

    With Invisalign®, patients visit their Invisalign dentist in Attaway, SC, every three months. With traditional braces, patients can expect to visit every month or every other month.

  • Cleaning-icon

    Cleaning

    Regular brushing and flossing is recommended for patients using Invisalign®. A specialized floss threading tool and regular brushing and flossing are recommended for patients with traditional braces.

  • Benefits

    Benefits

    Invisalign® is discrete, comfortable, can be removed, and doesn’t require any food restrictions. Traditional braces offer consistent progress, are effective for severe cases, have time-tested reliability, and can be a good choice for cost-conscious shoppers.

Ready to learn more about Invisalign® in Attaway, SC? Give our office a call, and we would be happy to get you scheduled for your first consultation.

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Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Are you craving a beautiful smile but feel that you’re too old for braces? You wouldn’t be the only adult to have that thought. However, the truth is that 25% of our orthodontic patients are now adults. At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, you’re never too old for braces!

We want you to know that a healthy, stunning smile is attainable no matter what age you are. Our orthodontist in Attaway, SC, offers several treatments that are perfect for working adults and can help you decide if braces are right. If you decide that adult braces are the way to go, we have a number of options for you to consider. From traditional metal braces that offer time-tested results to more discreet options like Invisalign®, your new smile is more attainable than you might think. During your initial visit with our doctor, we will review all of your treatment options and help you choose the one you need for optimal results.

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Benefits of Adult Braces

Most patients understand that a straighter smile is more aesthetic; however, not everyone knows that properly aligned teeth can improve your oral health. Here are just a few reasons why so many adults are optimizing their oral health with adult braces:

Benefits-of-Adult-Braces
More Confidence

More Confidence

If you’re feeling self-conscious about how your teeth look, you’re not alone. Millions of adults around the U.S. aren’t happy with the way that their oral aesthetics. Adult braces help restore your confidence and can give you a smile that you’re proud to show off. When you like the way your teeth look, you’ll be more likely to smile. This simple act makes you feel happier, reduces stress, and can improve your mental health. Plus, it makes people around you feel great too.

Less Bad Breath

Less Bad Breath

Few things are as nasty as speaking to someone with bad breath. We’ve all been there, but it is never any less embarrassing when someone tries to subtlety offer you a mint for your breath. What most folks don’t know is that misaligned teeth and bad breath are often connected. That’s because when your teeth are crooked or over-crowded, bacteria can find their way in between your teeth. This is an area that most toothbrushes can’t reach. With time, that bacteria builds up, and your breath begins to stink. When left unchecked, these bacteria can cause serious health problems.

Better Oral Health

Better Oral Health

When you have poor oral health, there are a number of health risks that should concern you. Misaligned teeth can cause bacteria to build up. Over time, harmful bacteria cause serious problems like cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease. Thankfully, orthodontic treatment can help you avoid severe tooth decay, gum recession, and bone loss. You can even reduce and prevent irregular tooth enamel loss pain associated with TMJ and TMD.

Enjoy More Foods

Enjoy More Foods

If you have never had a major problem with your teeth, you might not know that eating can be painful if you have misaligned teeth. This causes some patients to avoid foods that cause them pain. Adult braces can straighten your teeth and correct over and underbites for patients with severely crooked or crowded teeth. When you don’t have to worry about painful chewing or biting, you can experience the full joy of eating a delicious meal.

Improved Speech

Improved Speech

Having crooked teeth can make you feel self-conscious about your smile, but they can also affect how you pronounce certain words. If you’re having problems pronouncing words because your teeth are severely misaligned, adult braces can change your life. This is especially true for working professionals who speak publicly, take part in Zoom calls, and work over the phone. If this sounds like you, speak to our trusted Invisalign orthodontist in Attaway, SC, about discreet ways to improve your oral health and speech at the same time.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

Your child’s early and teen years are a great time to consider orthodontic treatment. According to The American Association of Orthodontists, the optimal time for a child to receive their first orthodontic treatment is by age seven. When you treat your child for braces early, you have the opportunity to discover and correct oral issues before they become serious. Doing so gives your child a leg-up on their peers and saves you time and money in the long run.

The overall goal of early orthodontic treatment is to intercept the possible issue, eliminate the cause, oversee facial and jawbone growth, and make sure there is enough space for adult teeth. Depending on how your child’s teeth develop, they may need a second course of treatment after their permanent teeth have formed.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

A few common orthodontic problems that may require treatment for children include:

  • Crossbites – this happens when your child’s jaw shifts to one side.
  • Underbites – this occurs when your child’s front lower teeth are ahead of their front upper teeth.
  • Excessively spaced teeth
  • Extremely crowded teeth
  • Extra teeth
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth that do not meet properly or don’t meet at all
  • Pacifier, finger, or thumb-sucking that affects your child’s jaw or teeth growth

The best way to learn whether your child will need early treatment is to speak with your orthodontist in Attaway, SC. Dr. Travis, Dr. Katie, and Dr. Gavin are trained to spot subtle problems, even in young children. During your child’s initial consultation, you can expect one of three outcomes:

  • There is a problem that early orthodontic treatment may correct.
  • Treatment may be necessary in the future. We’ll keep an eye on your child’s oral health while their face and jaw matures.
  • There is no treatment necessary at this stage.

Latest News in Attaway

Pigskin and peaches: Rivals have common goal

UGA, Clemson put aside differences to help region’s peach producers thriveGeorgia and South Carolina share a border, a passion for football and pride in their peaches.With the University of Georgia and Clemson University campuses separated by a mere 70 miles, the Bulldogs and Tigers began fighting it out on the football field in 1897, with the teams set to meet for the 65th time on Sept. 4, 2021.As pitched as the battle is on the football field, there’s an even deeper rivalry between the two ...

UGA, Clemson put aside differences to help region’s peach producers thrive

Georgia and South Carolina share a border, a passion for football and pride in their peaches.

With the University of Georgia and Clemson University campuses separated by a mere 70 miles, the Bulldogs and Tigers began fighting it out on the football field in 1897, with the teams set to meet for the 65th time on Sept. 4, 2021.

As pitched as the battle is on the football field, there’s an even deeper rivalry between the two states when it comes to their peaches.

Georgia earned its designation as the Peach State in the late 19th century when the state began exporting peaches to northern states, and the Georgia Legislature made it official in 1995.

South Carolina produces more peaches than any other state in the country other than California.

Despite their football rivalry, UGA and Clemson researchers have worked together for many years to help peach producers overcome the challenges of growing the iconic and delicious fruit.

Tackling pests and downing diseases

Similar growing conditions in the two states create an agricultural playing field where Clemson and UGA peach researchers plan and coordinate defense strategies against diseases, pests and climate variations. To help combat these culprits, the two universities created a joint appointment for a peach entomologist.

In 2016, Brett Blaauw joined the faculty as an assistant professor at both Clemson and UGA and as a member of both universities’ peach teams. His research focuses on integrating insect behavior and ecology to effectively and sustainably manage insect pests in Southeastern peach orchards.

“A lot of issues peach producers have in terms of insects span both states — and often the work we do in one state affects growers in both states,” Blaauw said. “In a lot of ways, it just makes sense to have someone in this split position.”

This season, Blaauw is collaborating with Clemson plant pathologist Guido Schnabel and horticulturist Juan Carlos Melgar to investigate how various mulching techniques can affect soil health and the subsequent impacts on tree health and insect pests. Blaauw and Schnabel also research how using horticultural oil to manage San Jose scale can be incorporated into the current disease management program for peaches.

“Many issues in peach production come from growing on the same soil over and over,” he said. “In a state where there is a long history of growing peaches, it is becoming harder and harder to grow peaches because of insect and disease issues attacking the fruit.”

Soils in which producers have been growing peaches for years can harbor bacteria, fungi and nematodes that can stress the trees. Blaauw and other researchers are looking for ways to mitigate this by adding different mulches to create healthier soils with the goal of “making healthier trees.”

This research benefits peach growers throughout the Southeast, Blaauw added.

Researchers from the two universities are also collaborating in an effort to combat Xap, the bacterium that causes the bacterial spot disease. This study, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and led by Clemson plant bacteriologist Hehe Wang, includes Schnabel and Jose Payero from Clemson and UGA Extension fruit disease specialist Phil Brannen, as well as researchers from other institutions. Together, they are working to determine how to effectively manage this disease and build a disease forecasting system for future growers.

“Annual losses of more than $20 million are estimated during years when the disease is heavy in South Carolina and Georgia,” Wang said. “This disease is difficult to control and once it makes its way to an orchard, it’s there for the life of that orchard. It’s a constant battle.”

When it comes to football, Brannen said he roots for UGA, and Blaauw, a Midwest native, cheers for Michigan State. But their work in peaches will sustain the friendly rivalry between peach growers in Georgia and South Carolina for many growing seasons to come.

North Charleston High School says good-bye to Attaway-Heinsohn Stadium

Former North Charleston High School football players and coaches will gather at venerable Attaway-Heinsohn Stadium for the last time on Friday night.The school will honor those players and coaches as the Cougars play host to Timberland in the final game scheduled for the stadium, which will be demolished after the season to make way for the Charleston County School District’s $43.7 million North Charleston Center for Advanced Studies.The planned center will offer technical training, such as auto repair, cosmetology and cu...

Former North Charleston High School football players and coaches will gather at venerable Attaway-Heinsohn Stadium for the last time on Friday night.

The school will honor those players and coaches as the Cougars play host to Timberland in the final game scheduled for the stadium, which will be demolished after the season to make way for the Charleston County School District’s $43.7 million North Charleston Center for Advanced Studies.

The planned center will offer technical training, such as auto repair, cosmetology and culinary arts, for students in five North Area high schools.

“We just want to give people a chance to come out for the final game and celebrate this occasion,” said North Charleston athletic director Raymond Knauer.

Attaway-Heinsohn Stadium, located across Montague Avenue from the high school, dates back to the 1950s and was named for two community-minded business leaders, Alvin F. Heinsohn and Hubert H. Attaway.

When the field was dedicated in 1956, it cost $160,000, seated 5,000 people and was described as “the largest in the state designed especially for high school use,” according to the News and Courier. Heinsohn was chairman of the Cooper River Parks and Playground Commission.

The stadium had “reinforced concrete stands, press box and ticket office and brick veneer walls,” the article reported.

It hasn’t changed much since then, Knauer said.

“It has not undergone any significant improvements, other than some cosmetic things,” he said. “It’s largely remained intact.”

Among the outstanding athletes to play at Attaway-Heinsohn Field are Nehemiah Broughton, who went on to The Citadel and an NFL career with five NFL teams, and David Meggett, who played in the NFL with the Giants, Patriots and Jets.

North Charleston hopes to play the 2020 season at Charleston County’s planned regional stadium on West Montague Avenue near Dorchester Road. The 6,000-seat stadium also will be home to Academic Magnet, Military Magnet Academy and Stall.

But the Cougars will have to scout out stadiums in which to play for at least the 2019 season.

“We have some options,” Knauer said. “We could play at Garrett if they are on the road, we can use the old Stall High School stadium, and there is Ravenel Stadium in West Ashley. We want to keep the games in North Charleston so our fans and parents can come out. It won’t be ideal, but we will make it work and be flexible for our students.”

Friday’s 7 p.m. game will be preceded by a community tailgate, sponsored by North Charleston alumni, North Charleston United Methodist Church and the Seacoast Dream Center. There will be free food and activities for kids beginning at about 4:30 p.m.

School district officials will be on hand, and there will be a Senior Night Celebration at halftime.

Lentils as viable S.C. crop? Prebiotic carbs could be used to breed new varieties

CLEMSON – A Clemson University doctoral student says prebiotic carbohydrates found in lentils are beneficial for both human and plant health and should be used to breed lentil varieties with higher nutritional values.These new varieties could make lentils a more viable crop for South Carolina farmers to grow and make it easier for low-income populations to have access to nutritious food.Prebiotic carbohydrates are specialized plant fibers that act as fertilizers to stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the human gut...

CLEMSON – A Clemson University doctoral student says prebiotic carbohydrates found in lentils are beneficial for both human and plant health and should be used to breed lentil varieties with higher nutritional values.

These new varieties could make lentils a more viable crop for South Carolina farmers to grow and make it easier for low-income populations to have access to nutritious food.

Prebiotic carbohydrates are specialized plant fibers that act as fertilizers to stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the human gut. These carbohydrates support healthy guts and are important in healthy diets. In addition, they help plants better tolerate cold and drought. The researchers believe enhancing prebiotic carbohydrates could lead to developing new lentil varieties.

Nathan Johnson of Grand Rapids, Minnesota, is focusing his graduate studies on developing a lentil genetic map of prebiotics for use in helping combat obesity. Johnson, who plans to be a medical doctor, is working with Dil Thavarajah, a Clemson plant and environmental sciences associate professor, and Stephen Kresovich, Robert and Lois Coker Trustees Endowed Chair of Genetics. Their research is supported by a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Institutes of Food and Agriculture.

“Diet-related ailments, such as obesity and micronutrient deficiencies, have global adverse impacts on society,” Johnson said. “Lentils have been associated with prevention of chronic illnesses, including Type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer. The development of lentil varieties containing enhanced prebiotic carbohydrates could help improve health benefits for humans, as well as help improve crop sustainability and production.”

Lentils are pulse crops that belong to the legume family. They contain significant amounts of prebiotic carbohydrates. Johnson and the other researchers believe it may be possible to enhance these amounts through breeding and genetics.

“Genetic mapping could help identify genetic markers associated with high levels of prebiotic carbohydrates,” Johnson said.

Lentils are high in fiber and fermentable carbohydrates known as FODMAPs, or fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols. This combination of fiber and fermentable carbohydrates causes gas and bloating in some people.

In addition to breeding for lentils that are easier to digest, the team also is researching to determine lentil genetic traits associated with growing. Current lentil lines produce well in cool weather, May to September in current growing regions. Most lentils grown in North America are grown in Washington state, Idaho and Canada.

Identifying genetic markers associated with high levels of prebiotic carbohydrates could help accelerate breeding for growing lentils in different climates, as well as help meet consumer preference for lentils.

“We have identified several significant genetic variants associated with these prebiotic carbohydrates,” Johnson said. “In the future, breeders will be able to use genetic markers based on these findings to develop improved lentil varieties.”

Having more varieties available can help make lentils available to more people. Known as “poor man’s meat,” pulse crops are high in protein and low in fat. They also are packed with folate, iron, phosphorus, potassium, selenium and manganese. Pulse crops, such as lentils, are nutritious and affordable. Many low-income populations use pulse crops as a staple food.

A report from the National Center for Biotechnology Information shows obesity and malnutrition have become significant health burdens, with an estimated 34% of adults and 15% to 20% of children and adolescents in the United States considered obese. Most often, the cheapest foods contain high levels of fat and sugar. A majority of obese people are from low-income families who eat these foods.

To help ease this health burden, Thavarajah said it is important to educate breeders on the importance of including nutrition quality traits into their pulse breeding programs.

“A diet rich in prebiotic fiber and low in calories is important in combating obesity by changing gut (digestive) health,” Thavarajah said. “Research related to this project will help develop lentil cultivars that, in the future, can be grown as a winter crop in South Carolina.”

Future lines for South Carolina would be grown from late November to early May. According to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources state climatology office, the state’s annual average temperature varies from the mid-50s in the mountains to low 60s along the coast.

A new oyster bar is opening in North Myrtle Beach with ties to Pop’s Garage. What to know

Robert and Amy Attaway own the land that contains Pop’s Garage & Alignment on Sea Mountain Highway in North Myrtle Beach and have been trying to determine what to do with a connected space.“We were trying to find something that would work here that we thought would complement the garage,” said Robert Attaway, a civil engineer who often travels.They believe they have identified the business, and the person to run it.The Attaways hope to open Tailgate Oyster Bar sometime this month with longtime chef ...

Robert and Amy Attaway own the land that contains Pop’s Garage & Alignment on Sea Mountain Highway in North Myrtle Beach and have been trying to determine what to do with a connected space.

“We were trying to find something that would work here that we thought would complement the garage,” said Robert Attaway, a civil engineer who often travels.

They believe they have identified the business, and the person to run it.

The Attaways hope to open Tailgate Oyster Bar sometime this month with longtime chef George Trizis as the general manager and chef.

The restaurant will have both automotive and old-school themes.

Tailgate was previously a gas station and convenience store. The Attaways replaced the gas pumps last summer with an approximately 500-square-foot covered outdoor wooden dance floor that can accommodate shag dancers and will serve as a waiting area. They plan to build a stage for live entertainment and bar with some outdoor seating there at some point.

The restaurant decor will feature classic car tailgates and bumpers, a working old-school Seeburg jukebox and photos of Grand Strand music and dance venues from the past.

Diners can sit at tables or along a rectangular stainless steel bar, and stainless steel is also featured on coolers and portions of walls.

The exterior side wall of the building features a mural of the former Sonny’s Pavilion in Cherry Grove and the side of an actual old Chevy truck towing the side of a boat. The passenger side of the truck adorns the back outside wall of the business.

Oysters can be ordered several ways including steamed, raw, blackened, char-grilled or pan fried and will be shucked for customers by employees and served in hubcaps. Several oyster varieties will be available, including local oysters when they’re in season.

“It’s going to be a lot of fun. I think a lot of people aren’t used to what I consider a true oyster bar, but I think they’ll like it,” Trizis said.

Trizis’ specialties include seafood scampi dishes, London broil and a village salad that resembles a Greek salad with some altered ingredients. There will also be changing weekly specials.

Other menu items include shrimp & grits, a Lowcountry boil, flounder and catch of the day, kabobs, po boys, crabcakes, burgers, homemade cornbread, soups, steampots and other steamed items, including shrimp and crab legs.

“We’re going to keep it interesting so the locals will come back,” said Trizis, who added that he wants to make the atmosphere “fun and goofy” so customers and employees will enjoy themselves. “Someplace where people really want to work and aren’t just working to make a paycheck.”

The restaurant will have three steamers, a chargrill, stove top and convection oven, but no fryers.

Desserts made by Amy Attaway include a lemon ‘cracker’ pie slice with a saltine cracker crust and spreadable chocolate chip cheese balls served with sweet crackers such as vanilla wafers or graham crackers.

“Everything that’s on this menu is going to be made from scratch,” Trizis said. “Everybody is going to have good food. We want to have something that stands out and is unique and is great food. Otherwise we’re just like anybody else.”

Trizis said he has been involved in restaurants since he worked at his father’s eatery when he was 7 years old, making toast and being paid in comic books.

He and his brother owned restaurants in Clearwater, Florida, including Country Skillet and Country Harvest, and he opened another one before he moved to Iowa for 10 years, where he was the executive chef at a Market Grille.

He moved to the Grand Strand in January and met the Attaways at the nondenominational Ocean Drive Pavilion Church in North Myrtle Beach. The owner of Pop’s Garage is also a member of the church.

The restaurant and garage will generally be open when the other is closed, as the oyster bar will initially open at 4 p.m. Attaway said he eventually plans to open for breakfast and brunch/lunch on weekends as well.

The opening has been postponed by a delay in the delivery of equipment parts due to the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on supply lines.

This story was originally published October 6, 2021 9:38 AM.

Fresh Water Fishing Trends

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources uses fishing guides who partner with them to provide information on fresh water and saltwater fishing trends for local anglers. Here is their report for local waters for July and August.Lake Murray Bass: Tournament anglers Stan Gunter and Andy Wicker report that in July there can be a good shallow buzzbait bite early and late, and when bream are spawning they will also attract bass to shallow water. The rivers offer another option where shallow cover can be fishable even during...

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources uses fishing guides who partner with them to provide information on fresh water and saltwater fishing trends for local anglers. Here is their report for local waters for July and August.

Lake Murray Bass: Tournament anglers Stan Gunter and Andy Wicker report that in July there can be a good shallow buzzbait bite early and late, and when bream are spawning they will also attract bass to shallow water. The rivers offer another option where shallow cover can be fishable even during the day. Fish may also start to suspend and be caught around offshore cane piles on topwater lures, and you can always target deep brush with a worm. Striped bass: Captain Brad Taylor (803-331-1354) reports that by the end of June it was almost exclusively a down-line bite, and this month fish should go even deeper. They will be caught on down-lined live herring as deep as 60 plus feet, and by about the third week of July the vast majority of the fish will have left the middle section of the lake and almost everything will be in the lower pool. Crappie: Captain Brad Taylor reports that fish will continue to hold around brush in July, but instead of being found at the mouths of creek they should group up on the main run. The mid-lake should be a good section to fish with minnows and jigs. Catfish: Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that both because of feeding patterns and boat traffic the night bite will be much better during July. Dip baits and a variety of cut bait will catch fish in shallow water.

Santee Cooper Bass: Captain Brett Mitchell (803-379-7029) reports that the July heat doesn’t help the bite, but there are still some decent patterns this month. The best bet is fishing with topwater lures early, and then fishing with soft plastics around trees later in the day. If it gets very hot or water levels drop bass could move out deeper. Crappie: Captain Steve English (843-729-4044) reports that this month fish should continue to be caught on mid-depth brush with minnows, but as it gets very hot they could move a little deeper. Bream: Captain Steve English (843-729-4044) reports that around the new and full moons waves of bluegill and shellcracker should come shallow to spawn where they can be caught on crickets and worms. Catfish: Captain Stevie English (843-709-8138) reports that in July fishing in the shallows with cut bait at night should be the primary pattern, and fish will also be caught drifting.

Saltwater Fishing Trends

Charleston Inshore: Redfin Charters (843-277-5255) and Captain Rob Bennett (843-367-3777) reports that as temperatures start to get very hot along the coast inshore fishing can get tougher. The summer heat and the threat of afternoon pop-up storms make morning the best time to fish in July, and if you fish early this month you can still catch trout, flounder and redfish on live bait such as finger mullet, mud minnows or shrimp under a popping cork. Note that effective July 1 flounder regulations changed, with a new limit of 5 fish per person (from 10) and 10 per boat (from 20). The minimum size moved to 16 inches (from 15). Nearshore: Captain Rob Bennett reports that in July the spadefish bite should continue to be really good at the nearshore reefs, and Spanish mackerel, king mackerel, and amberjack should continue to be caught.

Edisto Island Inshore: Captain Ron Davis Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that starting around July 4 finger mullet usually reach the perfect size for bait and will be readily available. In July they hope the trout bite will pick up around main river points with mullet as well as mud minnows, shrimp or artificials. Redfish action should be fair on the flats with shrimp and in the creeks with mud minnows or finger mullet. Small sheepshead are prolific in the creeks in July. Tarpon have already showed up and fishing for these silver kings should get better and better this month. Flounder should be catchable with mud minnows over sandy or hard bottoms, particularly at the mouth of creeks. Note that effective July 1 flounder regulations changed, with a new limit of 5 fish per person (from 10) and 10 per boat (from 20). The minimum size moved to 16 inches (from 15). Nearshore/ offshore: Spanish mackerel and king mackerel are already thick at the nearshore reefs and will hang around throughout the month, while the spadefish action should continue to be good all of July. Bottom fishing will stay good, while at the Gulf Stream some dolphin, wahoo, tuna and even billfish will be caught.

Beaufort Inshore: Captain Tuck Scott with Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that in July tailing redfish can be found on good flood tides, and on moving tides fishing live or cut bait around ambush points is a good bet. Trout can be found around ambush points where they will eat live bait or jigs, and migratory species like jacks and tarpon which are already showing up should be around until the fall. Part-time Beaufort resident John Long of East Columbia Sport Shop (803-776-8320) reports that there is a strong population of black drum and sheepshead in Beaufort right now, and both species will eat fiddler crabs fished around structure. Flounder fishing can be good with live finger mullet or minnows but varies from day to day. Note that effective July 1 flounder regulations changed, with a new limit of 5 fish per person (from 10) and 10 per boat (from 20). The minimum size moved to 16 inches (from 15).

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