Orthodontist in Ashdale, SC

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A smile is such a simple thing, but it can hold so much power. Smiling is universally considered to be a way that humans display joy. Smiles communicate to others how we’re feeling and are often the best way to break the ice when meeting a new person. A good-natured smile can work wonders, but if you’re like most folks, your smile may not be perfect. Every day, we hear stories from people who feel embarrassed, ashamed, or even scared to flash their smile. In fact, 75% of prospective orthodontic patients could benefit from straighter teeth. Thankfully, Winning Orthodontic Smiles offers affordable orthodontic solutions that give our patients a healthier mouth, more self-esteem, and more confidence.

At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, your smile is our passion. Our orthodontists and hygienists are dedicated to providing you with the best orthodontic care possible in a stress-free, comfortable setting. We know what a difference a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to giving our clients a winning smile they love.

Having served the Lowcountry for more than 30 years, we know that no two patients have the exact orthodontic needs. That’s why we offer a variety of treatment options to correct each patient’s unique concerns, along with payment plans that make braces affordable for every family. You can rest easy knowing that our team specializes in the latest innovations in the field of orthodontics. This allows us to treat our patients in the most efficient, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing ways possible.

A few of our orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina include:
  • Invisalign®
  • Invisalign® Teen
  • Clear Braces
  • Traditional Braces
  • Early Treatment
  • Adult Treatment

If you’re looking for an orthodontist in Ashdale, SC, who is professional, trustworthy, and compassionate, look no further than Winning Orthodontic Smiles. Your pathway to a beautiful smile starts by selecting the orthodontic treatment option best suited for your needs.

Service Area

Invisalign Treatment

Invisalign® Treatment in Ashdale, SC

Over the last few years, Invisalign® has become one of the most popular and effective orthodontic treatment options in South Carolina. For those looking for a convenient, comfortable, discreet way to realign their teeth, Invisalign® should be on your shortlist.

What Is Invisalign®?

Invisalign® is a treatment used by orthodontists in Ashdale that straightens patients’ teeth without traditional braces. Invisalign® works using a succession of custom trays that cover your teeth, which gently pull them into proper alignment over time. Each custom tray brings your teeth closer to their final position. Treatment times vary depending on how severe your case is but typically don’t last longer than two years. Once treatment is complete, you may need a retainer for the longest-lasting results.

Since they are clear, most patients find Invisalign® less noticeable than traditional braces. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign® can be removed while eating, meaning patients don’t have to worry about damaging their trays with certain foods. Invisalign® is great for people of all ages and has become a top choice for teens and adults alike.

Invisalign® works well for patients who have:
  • Crooked teeth
  • Gapped or spaced teeth
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Overbites, Underbites, and Crossbites

How Does Invisalign® Work?

Invisalign® works for most patients in a three-step process:
Initial Consultation

Initial Consultation

You will meet with your Invisalign orthodontist in Ashdale, SC. During this consultation, your doctor will take a 3D digital scan of your teeth. From there, they will put together a comprehensive treatment plan customized to your needs. The best part? Before you leave, they will give you a sneak peek at your new smile using an innovative scanner.

First Fitting

First Fitting

During this step, your orthodontist will make sure that your custom aligners fit correctly. If you have any questions, this is the perfect time to ask. Before you leave, your doctor will let you know what to expect over the coming weeks and months. Treatment completion times will vary for patients, but you should see early results in just a few weeks. During this, you will check in regularly with your orthodontist.

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile

Love Your Smile – Once your treatment is complete, it’s time to show off your new smile to as many people as possible! Be sure to ask your orthodontist if you will need to use a retainer to keep your teeth straight over the long haul. The last thing you want is for your teeth to shift gradually back into their original positions.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces – Which is Right for You?

With so many great teeth straightening options available today, it can be hard to settle on a treatment choice. One of the most common questions we get revolves around which treatment is better: Invisalign® or traditional braces? The answer to that question is nuanced since every patient will have different needs. A younger patient with slightly crooked teeth might benefit from the discreet features of Invisalign®. On the other hand, an older patient with a severe underbite might benefit more from the reliability of traditional braces.

Invisalign® vs. Traditional Braces–Which is Right for You?
Keep in mind the following highlights, which will help you remain informed when doing your research:
Are They Removable? Invisalign® trays can be removed. Traditional braces cannon.
  • Treatment-Length-icon

    Treatment Length

    Invisalign® treatment can last anywhere from six months to two years. Treatment times for traditional braces can last from one to three years. Each time frame can vary depending on the patient’s individual case.

  • Orthodontic-Visits

    Orthodontic Visits:

    With Invisalign®, patients visit their Invisalign dentist in Ashdale, SC, every three months. With traditional braces, patients can expect to visit every month or every other month.

  • Cleaning-icon

    Cleaning

    Regular brushing and flossing is recommended for patients using Invisalign®. A specialized floss threading tool and regular brushing and flossing are recommended for patients with traditional braces.

  • Benefits

    Benefits

    Invisalign® is discrete, comfortable, can be removed, and doesn’t require any food restrictions. Traditional braces offer consistent progress, are effective for severe cases, have time-tested reliability, and can be a good choice for cost-conscious shoppers.

Ready to learn more about Invisalign® in Ashdale, SC? Give our office a call, and we would be happy to get you scheduled for your first consultation.

Contact Us

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Are you craving a beautiful smile but feel that you’re too old for braces? You wouldn’t be the only adult to have that thought. However, the truth is that 25% of our orthodontic patients are now adults. At Winning Orthodontic Smiles, you’re never too old for braces!

We want you to know that a healthy, stunning smile is attainable no matter what age you are. Our orthodontist in Ashdale, SC, offers several treatments that are perfect for working adults and can help you decide if braces are right. If you decide that adult braces are the way to go, we have a number of options for you to consider. From traditional metal braces that offer time-tested results to more discreet options like Invisalign®, your new smile is more attainable than you might think. During your initial visit with our doctor, we will review all of your treatment options and help you choose the one you need for optimal results.

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

Benefits of Adult Braces

Most patients understand that a straighter smile is more aesthetic; however, not everyone knows that properly aligned teeth can improve your oral health. Here are just a few reasons why so many adults are optimizing their oral health with adult braces:

Benefits-of-Adult-Braces
More Confidence

More Confidence

If you’re feeling self-conscious about how your teeth look, you’re not alone. Millions of adults around the U.S. aren’t happy with the way that their oral aesthetics. Adult braces help restore your confidence and can give you a smile that you’re proud to show off. When you like the way your teeth look, you’ll be more likely to smile. This simple act makes you feel happier, reduces stress, and can improve your mental health. Plus, it makes people around you feel great too.

Less Bad Breath

Less Bad Breath

Few things are as nasty as speaking to someone with bad breath. We’ve all been there, but it is never any less embarrassing when someone tries to subtlety offer you a mint for your breath. What most folks don’t know is that misaligned teeth and bad breath are often connected. That’s because when your teeth are crooked or over-crowded, bacteria can find their way in between your teeth. This is an area that most toothbrushes can’t reach. With time, that bacteria builds up, and your breath begins to stink. When left unchecked, these bacteria can cause serious health problems.

Better Oral Health

Better Oral Health

When you have poor oral health, there are a number of health risks that should concern you. Misaligned teeth can cause bacteria to build up. Over time, harmful bacteria cause serious problems like cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease. Thankfully, orthodontic treatment can help you avoid severe tooth decay, gum recession, and bone loss. You can even reduce and prevent irregular tooth enamel loss pain associated with TMJ and TMD.

Enjoy More Foods

Enjoy More Foods

If you have never had a major problem with your teeth, you might not know that eating can be painful if you have misaligned teeth. This causes some patients to avoid foods that cause them pain. Adult braces can straighten your teeth and correct over and underbites for patients with severely crooked or crowded teeth. When you don’t have to worry about painful chewing or biting, you can experience the full joy of eating a delicious meal.

Improved Speech

Improved Speech

Having crooked teeth can make you feel self-conscious about your smile, but they can also affect how you pronounce certain words. If you’re having problems pronouncing words because your teeth are severely misaligned, adult braces can change your life. This is especially true for working professionals who speak publicly, take part in Zoom calls, and work over the phone. If this sounds like you, speak to our trusted Invisalign orthodontist in Ashdale, SC, about discreet ways to improve your oral health and speech at the same time.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

Your child’s early and teen years are a great time to consider orthodontic treatment. According to The American Association of Orthodontists, the optimal time for a child to receive their first orthodontic treatment is by age seven. When you treat your child for braces early, you have the opportunity to discover and correct oral issues before they become serious. Doing so gives your child a leg-up on their peers and saves you time and money in the long run.

The overall goal of early orthodontic treatment is to intercept the possible issue, eliminate the cause, oversee facial and jawbone growth, and make sure there is enough space for adult teeth. Depending on how your child’s teeth develop, they may need a second course of treatment after their permanent teeth have formed.

Early Orthodontic Treatment

A few common orthodontic problems that may require treatment for children include:

  • Crossbites – this happens when your child’s jaw shifts to one side.
  • Underbites – this occurs when your child’s front lower teeth are ahead of their front upper teeth.
  • Excessively spaced teeth
  • Extremely crowded teeth
  • Extra teeth
  • Missing teeth
  • Teeth that do not meet properly or don’t meet at all
  • Pacifier, finger, or thumb-sucking that affects your child’s jaw or teeth growth

The best way to learn whether your child will need early treatment is to speak with your orthodontist in Ashdale, SC. Dr. Travis, Dr. Katie, and Dr. Gavin are trained to spot subtle problems, even in young children. During your child’s initial consultation, you can expect one of three outcomes:

  • There is a problem that early orthodontic treatment may correct.
  • Treatment may be necessary in the future. We’ll keep an eye on your child’s oral health while their face and jaw matures.
  • There is no treatment necessary at this stage.

Latest News in Ashdale

Child who tripped on prison mat secures more than €25,000

High Court judge says scar over girl’s right eyebrow not a significant blemish It was claimed Chardonnay Ward fell over a kink on a mat placed on a wet floor near a doorway at Cloverhill Prison (above) and fell, hurting her head. File photograph: Colin Keegan/CollinsA girl who has a facial scar after tripping over a mat at the Cloverhill Prison visitor centre has secured €25,842 und...

High Court judge says scar over girl’s right eyebrow not a significant blemish

It was claimed Chardonnay Ward fell over a kink on a mat placed on a wet floor near a doorway at Cloverhill Prison (above) and fell, hurting her head. File photograph: Colin Keegan/Collins

A girl who has a facial scar after tripping over a mat at the Cloverhill Prison visitor centre has secured €25,842 under a settlement of her High Court action.

Chardonnay Ward was aged 4 when the incident happened. It was claimed she fell over a kink on the mat and hit her head.

Now aged 9, the girl, of Ashdale, Coosan, Athlone, Co Westmeath had, through her mother Margaret Roche, sued the governor of Cloverhill Prison as a result of the fall on February 16th, 2012.

It was claimed the child fell over a kink on a mat placed on a wet floor near the doorway and fell against a plastic chair and a windowsill, hurting the side of her head and above her eye.

It was claimed there was failure to keep the floor of the premises free from articles likely to cause the child to slip and fall and to take any appropriate measures to remove the dangers presented by water on the floor.

It was further claimed there was failure to take any, or any adequate, precautions for the safety of the child whilst visiting the prison.

The claims were denied.

In court on Thursday, Kerida Naidoo SC, for the child, said the little girl and her mother had visited a man in the prison and were leaving the visitor centre when the incident happened.

Holding the child’s hand

Counsel said the mother reported she was holding the child’s hand when the incident happened and there was a kink on the floor mat. The child was taken to hospital and later recovered but has been left with a permanent scar over her right eyebrow.

As a result of the permanent scar, the case was transferred to the High Court from the Circuit Court, where the maximum damages that can be awarded is €75,000.

Seeking approval of the €25,000 offer, Mr Naidoo said that, outside court earlier, his side had been told the other side intended to call witnesses who would contend the mother was not holding the child’s hand, there was no kink in the mat and it was not wet.

His side had checked the rainfall for the date of the incident and it showed it was dry in Dublin that day.

Approving the settlement of €25,842, Mr Justice Kevin Cross said the scar was not a significant blemish.

Young herd leads to gold award for Katunga farmers

The Cavallaro family, from Katunga, has taken out a gold award for producing some of the country's best milk as part of Dairy Australia's 2020 Milk Quality Awards.The awards recognise farmers producing the country’s best milk based on bulk milk cell count (BMCC).Gold awards are given to the ‘Top 100’ dairy farmers nationally for milk quality and Alex Cavallaro said while it was nice to be recognised, the family didn't do it for awards.“Even if they didn’t do it (the awards), we still would b...

The Cavallaro family, from Katunga, has taken out a gold award for producing some of the country's best milk as part of Dairy Australia's 2020 Milk Quality Awards.

The awards recognise farmers producing the country’s best milk based on bulk milk cell count (BMCC).

Gold awards are given to the ‘Top 100’ dairy farmers nationally for milk quality and Alex Cavallaro said while it was nice to be recognised, the family didn't do it for awards.

“Even if they didn’t do it (the awards), we still would be doing the same things but it's nice to see we are being recognised,” he said.

Mr Cavallaro, who farms with his parents, Cosimo and Rosie, and his wife Anna, said the family had milked about 2500 Friesian cows ever since they started dairying in 2000 and explained the secrets to their success

“We keep a young herd,” he said.

“We cull pretty heavily on any old cows, we don't employ people — just have a family-run business — and keeping an eye on the cows and selling off mastitis cows instead of treating them for too long (are reasons for our success).”

Mr Cavallaro said the biggest change they had implemented on-farm was changing crops to adapt to the water availability issues.

“We used to grow summer pastures but we've gone from permanent pasture to annual rye-grasses.

“They are not as reliant on water and you get better quality feed.”

According to Dairy Australia, focus on low cell counts helps increase milk yields and can improve the milk income received by farmers.

Most processing companies pay a premium for milk with a cell count below 250,000 cells/ml and Dairy Australia analysis estimates that a farmer milking 300 cows who lowers their BMCC from 250,000 to 100,000 would be financially better off to the tune of $39,000 a year.

Data for the Milk Quality Awards is supplied to Dairy Australia by dairy companies across the country.

To be eligible, dairy farms must have data for a minimum of nine months in a calendar year.

Monthly averages are then used to calculate the annual average BMCC for each farm.

Other northern Victorian winners:

Ashdale 55 Pty Ltd

Ashley J Fiedler

BD & KL Mitchell

C & R Cavallaro

JR Campbell

CL Freemantle Pty Ltd

Coowonga Family Trust

D & M Colbert

JW & VL Douglas

C & N Hibberson

SG & SJ Jones

RA & HJ Doolan Pty Ltd

RJ & JR Rixon Pty Ltd

RJ Perkins & SF Evans

SJ & AK Christopher

SC & VJ Winchester

H & S Stephens

NJ Wild NJ

WJ & A Stammers

To see the full list of winners, visit: dairyaustralia.com.au/farm/animal-management/mastitis/milk-quality-awards/2020-milk-quality-award-winners

Be Free or Die is a captivating tale of a hero’s rise

Robert Smalls: Union hero, steamer captain, congressman, U.S. Custom’s collector. There are many prestigious titles one could assign Smalls, and even more stories they could tell about the man. Author and veteran journalist Cate Lineberry touches on them all. Lineberry knows that before he became the subject of national news articles, before he met with President Lincoln in D.C., before he inspired thousands of recently freed and escaped African-American men to take up arms against the Confederate soldiers, Smalls was a Lowcountry slav...

Robert Smalls: Union hero, steamer captain, congressman, U.S. Custom’s collector. There are many prestigious titles one could assign Smalls, and even more stories they could tell about the man. Author and veteran journalist Cate Lineberry touches on them all. Lineberry knows that before he became the subject of national news articles, before he met with President Lincoln in D.C., before he inspired thousands of recently freed and escaped African-American men to take up arms against the Confederate soldiers, Smalls was a Lowcountry slave. And Lineberry knows that in order to tell a good story, a true story, one must start at the beginning.

[image-1]

Smalls’ story begins in April 1839 when he was born in his mother Lydia’s “sparse slave quarters” in Beaufort, S.C. Although the vicissitudes of his life are not documented in a diary or a journal, Lineberry has been able to, through rigorous research, gather salient pieces of Smalls’ early years. “The most interesting part to me was the Civil War, his most formative years,” says Lineberry. “The drive to escape from slavery — that really propelled him on his journey.”

Lineberry, a history buff who was a staff writer and editor for National Geographic and the web editor for Smithsonian magazine, says she has always been interested in the Civil War, especially because she had ancestors who fought on both sides at the Battle of Gettysburg. But she’d never heard of Smalls. “My brother sent me an article about Smalls and I couldn’t believe I didn’t know about him. I started looking into it and found that I just fell in love with the story, this story of triumph. I thought ‘What does this person have that enables him to overcome the messages he’s received since he was a child?’ He really embraced the opportunities that came his way. I was hooked from the beginning.”

We know that Smalls’ mother Lydia, like many slaves at the time, was forbidden to learn to read, but she was well-versed in Gullah, a culture developed from customs stemming from the Bakongo, Igbo, Ewe, Malinke, Mossi, Gola, Wolof, and Kissi peoples of West and Central Africa. “The Gullah traditions helped people maintain their identities and their connections as they performed the grueling year-round work required of them on the plantations,” writes Lineberry. This was the culture Smalls was born into: a wealthy deep South town located 70 miles from what would be the “heart” of the Confederacy, populated mostly by enslaved Africans who toiled in the South Carolina sun day in and day out, finding connections when and if they could, working to produce the fine cotton that would further enrich their white owners.

[image-2]

Fortunately for Smalls, he was favored by his owner, Henry McKee, and was frequently by McKee’s side “accompanying him on his trips to Ashdale.” Lydia never named the boy’s father, but he was thought to be a white man, and possibly even to be McKee. This favoritism landed Smalls a position as a house servant, and, eventually, would send him to Charleston.

At only 12 years old, Smalls arrived in the “bustling port city” of Charleston. The city was aristocratic, busy, and beautfiul, but Smalls soon saw its dark side. “Naked men, women, and children were sold in open slave markets near the Old Exchange Building as potential buyers evaluated them as if they were livestock,” writes Lineberry. There was also the notorious Work House, a former sugar warehouse that Charlestonians called the “Sugar House.” Lineberry includes accounts from famous abolitionist Angelina Grimké, who wrote that one female slave “was forced to walk the treadmill, which provided power for grinding corn at the Work House. As with all enslaved people sentenced to this form of torture, her hands were tied above her head and her feet to a plank.”

This was not the first time Smalls had come face to face with the raw and vicious iniquities of slavery. Before traveling to Charleston, Smalls was taken by Lydia to a slave auction in Beaufort, to help “prepare Robert for whatever his future held,” writes Lineberry. After witnessing the brutal whipping of a slave, “Robert became angry and rebellious.” He would later write that while he had “no trouble with my owner … My aunt was whipped so many a time until she has not the same skin she was born with.”

In Charleston Smalls likely lived in the slave quarters of McKee’s sister-in-law Eliza Ancrum where he was hired out to others and “largely left to fend for himself.” Smalls, starting out as a waiter at the Planter’s Hotel, would eventually be drawn to the Charleston docks, quickly acquiring the skills necessary to pilot a ship.

By 19, Smalls was married and had a daughter. With this new responsibility, Smalls was determined to seek freedom, if not for himself, than for his family. Lineberry details the event that would change Smalls’ life — commandeering the 147-foot long steamer, the Planter, and delivering the valuable vessel and guns to Union lines — and all the events that would follow. It’s a redemption story, and, as Lineberry notes, a story of triumph.

Smalls was brave, skilled, astute, and determined to “be free or die.” But perhaps the most incredible part of his story, skillfully told and thoroughly researched by Lineberry in Be Free or Die, is thinking about all the other Robert Smalls that may have existed. “There were untold number of slaves that escaped to Union lines,” says Lineberry. “It speaks to the determination of people and the desperation of their circumstances. You wonder how many stories we don’t know.”

Fri. June 23 Lineberry, along with Michael Moore — the great great grandson of Smalls and the CEO/President of the new Charleston International African American Museum — will discuss Be Free or Die at an author luncheon.

NSW I and QLD I on top after Schools Champs day one

QLD I and NSW I put down markers on the first day of the Australian School Championship in Sydney in dominant opening wins.Both sides ran in high scores to finish on top of their respective pools on day one, with two more days of pool play remaining.QLD I beat a gritty WA 67-12, led by a four-try effort from winger Glen Vaihu.WA's scrumhalf Reece Anapu was a shining light for his side on a tough afternoon, as they built some strong second-half pressure.It was NSW I that dominated proceedings earlier in the day, wi...

QLD I and NSW I put down markers on the first day of the Australian School Championship in Sydney in dominant opening wins.

Both sides ran in high scores to finish on top of their respective pools on day one, with two more days of pool play remaining.

QLD I beat a gritty WA 67-12, led by a four-try effort from winger Glen Vaihu.

WA's scrumhalf Reece Anapu was a shining light for his side on a tough afternoon, as they built some strong second-half pressure.

It was NSW I that dominated proceedings earlier in the day, with an 80-5 win over Victoria in their first outing.

Flyhalf Tane Edmed steered the ship superbly for NSW I, who never really looked troubled by the Victorians.

ACT kept their title defence on track with an 18-0 win over QLD II, but they didn't have the same dominance of their northern rivals.

Brendan Jimenez, returning for the second straight year, was a standout for the ACT boys in the clash, one of the front runners for the Australian Schools side.

NSW II rounded out the victors on day one, beating Combined States 45-22.

The competition will pick up again on Tuesday July 10, with the second round of pool play LIVE on RUGBY.com.au.

All times AEST.

NSW II 45

Tries: Rizk 2, Hickey 2, Hawkes, Tejcek, Holz

Cons: Minogue 5

Combined States 22

Tries: Saunders, Murray, Gibbs, Bryden

Cons: Gibbs

NSW I 80

Tries: Albert 2, Walton 2 Moretti 2, Pollard, Wingrove, Tricks, Dutaillis

Cons: Edmed 10

Victoria 5

Tries: Tuilagl

QLD II 0

ACT 18

Tries: Teoteo, Toole

Cons: Jimenez

Pens: Jimenez 2

QLD I 67

WA 12

Tuesday July 10

10am – ACT vs NSW I

11:30am – QLD I vs Combined States

1pm – QLD II vs VIC

2:30pm – WA vs NSW II

Thursday July 12

10am – VIC vs ACT

11:30am – WA vs Combined States

1pm – NSW II vs QLD I

2:30pm – NSW I vs QLD II

Saturday July 14

8:30am – Pool A 4th vs Pool B 4th

9:45am – NSW School Girls 7s

10am – Pool A 3rd vs Pool B 3rd

11:15am – Pool A 2nd vs Pool B 2nd

12:30pm – NSW School Girls 7s

12:45pm – Pool A 1st vs Pool B 1st

ACT

Apenisa Driti (Gungahlin College), Oliver Efkarpidis (St Edmund’s College), Zane Hogan (St Edmund’s College), Samuel Mickelson (Brindabella Christian College), Zachary Perrin (Daramalan College), Matthew Kingma (Daramalan College, Daryl Bailey (Erindale College), Rory Scott (Marist College), Joel Atkins Daramalan College, Isaac Crowe (Daramalan College), Corey Toole (Mater Dei Catholic College), Bryce Keane (Marist College), Abraham Peters (Gungahlin College), Thomas Haddad (Daramalan College), Brendan Jimenez (St Edmund’s College), Liki Chan-Tung (Hawker College), John Madjaga (Erindale College), Tony Eli (Erindale College), Alexavier Punou (St Edmund’s College), Davea TeoTeo (St Edmund’s College),Josiah Lealiifano (Gungahlin College), Reece Chin (Erindale College), Junior Tupou (St Edmund’s College).

Combined States

Ben Bryden (Barker College), Alex Davies (Brisbane Grammar School), Dominic Easy (St Ignatius' College Riverview), Harry Flaherty (Barker College), Maea Fonua (Xavier College, Llandillo), Jude Gibbs (St Joseph’s College, Hunters Hill), Saxon Gillies (St Ignatius' College, Riverview), Thomas Gore (Downlands College), Lathan Hutchinson-Walters (Waverley College), Jayden Lynch (Alstonville High School), Hamish Mac Smith (The King's School), Conor Molloy (Waverley College), Oscar Moran (Oxley College), Nicholas Murray (St Josephs College, Hunters Hill), Ben Pollack (St Aloysius' College), Aaron Prosser (Anglican Church Grammar School), Alexander Rahme (St Aloysius' College), Benjamin Robson (The Scots College), Dylan Saunders (Windsor High School), Joseph Suaalii (The King's School), Brett Wellington (The Scots College), Harry Whiteman (Waverley College), Nathan Zylstra (The Scots College), Jack Johnson-Holmes (Newcastle High School)

NSW I

Angus Bell (Newington College), Billy Pollard (Barker College), Thomas Lambert (Trinity Grammar School), Jeremy Williams (The Scots College), Will Harris (The Scots College), Luke Reimer (Barker College), Donny Freeman (Kinross Wolaroi), Luca Moretti (Waverley College), Seb Strang (The Scots College), Tane Edmed (Trinity Grammar School), Matthew Dutallis (St Ignatius College), Joey Walton (Wadalba High School), Lachlan Ilias (Trinity Grammar School), Fred Tricks (The Scots College), John Connolly (The Kings School), Will McLennan (St Ignatius College), Angus Collison (Barker College), Nicholas Wingrove (The Scots College), Oliver Smyth (John Paul College, Coffs Harbour), Hugh Bokenham (St Joseph’s College, Hunters Hill), Lachlan Albert (St Ignatius College), Charlie Savala (The Scots College), Jack Mossman (The Scots College)

NSW II

Hugo Patterson (The Scots College), Jack Winchester (Bishop Druitt College), Archer Holz (The Kings School), Tom Hooper (St Stanislaus’ College), Lachlan Dring (Barker College), Sean Vaivelata (St Augustine’s College),Zac Barnabas (St Augustine’s College), Aiden Kelso (Kinross Wolaroi), David Tejcek (Barker College), Matt Minogue (The Kings School), Liam Scolari (St Joseph’s College), Vincent Creagh (St Joseph’s College), Faiva Faiva (Campbelltown PAHS), Angus Bell (St Ignatius College), Daniel Ala (St Augustine’s College), Julian Heaven (St Joseph’s College), Will Smith (Kinross Wolaroi), Malachi Hawkes (Trinity Grammar), Doughal O’Reilly (McCarthy Catholic College), Hagen Size (Farrer MAHS), Cooper Chambers (Trinity Grammar), Connor Hickey (Narrabeen Sports High), Joshua Rizk (Holy Cross College)

QLD I

Harrison Vella (St Joseph’s Nudgee College), Tyrell Kopua (The Southport School), Zane Nongorr (The Southport School), William Chaffey (Toowoomba Grammar School), Fred Fewtrell (Anglican Church Grammar School), Thomas van der Schyff (The Southport School), William Roach (St Joseph's College, Gregory Terrace), Bailey Tautau (St Joseph's Nudgee College), Spencer Jeans (The Southport School), Carter Gordan (Brisbane Boys' College), Glen Vaihu (St Joseph's College, Gregory Terrace), Reesjan Pasitoa (St Joseph's Nudgee College), Dennis Waight (Brisbane Grammar School), Jangala Bennet (St Joseph's Nudgee College),Shaquille McLeod (Marist College Ashgrove), Nesta Mahina (Brisbane State High School), John Downes (Marist College Ashgrove), Bradley Kuhn (St Patricks College, Shorncliffe), Zeph Tuinona (Brisbane State High School), Matthew Engelbrecht (St Joseph's Nudgee College), Rhiann Stowers (Somerset College), Daniel Condon (St Joseph's College, Gregory Terrace), Ronan Kapi (The Southport School)

QLD II

John-Paul Tominiko (Anglican Church Grammar School), Zac Crothers (Anglican Church Grammar School), Emile Tuimavave (Brisbane Grammar School), Harry Fox (Padua College), Reece Meise (Downlands College), Ben Geraghty (Marist College Ashgrove), Cayle Manu (St Joseph’s Nudgee College), Bruce Tevaga (Padua College), William Kirk (St Joseph’s College, Gregory Terrace), Meli Dreu (Ipswich Grammar School), Jordan Carriera (Ipswich Grammar School), Francis Pona (Brisbane State High School), Josh Flook (St Joseph’s College, Gregory Terrace), Daniel Atkinson (St Joseph’s Nudgee College), Jasper Mellish (Siena Catholic College), Samuel Finocchiaro (Iona College), Peter Halapio (Downlands College), Romeo Tanielu (Ipswich Grammar School), Kotahi Hetaraka (Iona College), William MacPherson (Anglican Church Grammar School), Kalani Thomas (Ipswich Grammar School), Grant Tuisamoa (Brisbane State High School), Jack Bowyer (Brisbane Boys’ College)

VIC

Nicholas Roostan (Billanook College), Charlie Carter (Williamstown High School), RJ David (The Grange P-12 College), Michael Tynan (Marcellin College), Josh Canham (Brighton Grammar School), Victor Hosking (Simonds Catholic College), Liam Stone (The Grange P-12 College), Isaac Aedo Kailea (Ringwood Secondary College), Aukusitino Lalotoa-Hunt (Noble Park Secondary College), Kai Kearns (Marcellin College), David Fangatua (Melton Secondary College), Mosese Tuipulotu (St Kevin's College), Kaliam Lambert-Crichton (Tarneit College), Haloti Fonua (Victoria University Secondary College), Jordan Hobbs (Marcellin College), Konileti Wolfgramm (St Patrick's College), Monson Vaovasa (Gladstone Park Secondary College), Niko Faoagali (Hume Central Secondary College), Jacob Beaumont (Greensborough College), Sam Tuibua (Point Cook Senior Secondary College), Luke Palu (Wantirna College), Oliver McGovern (Ivanhoe Grammar School), Liae Tuilagi (Fountain Gate Secondary College)

WA

Alexander Masibaka (Aranmore Catholic College), Ben Weir (Aranmore Catholic College), Dante Tatafu (Aranmore Catholic College), Darcy Hinkley (Greenwood College), Devante Nathan (Aranmore Catholic College), Isaac Evans (Guildford Grammar School), Jaden Nelson (Aranmore Catholic College), James Sinclair (Aranmore Catholic College), Jaydon Solomon (Aranmore Catholic Collage), Joshua Plane (Quinns Baptist college), Joshua James Kamizona-Heke Aranmore Catholic College, Keenan Wentholt (Butler College), Lachlan Hardy (Churchlands Senior High School), Maui Te Tana (Ashdale SC), Max Wood (St Stephens Carramar campus), Meihana Mason (Aranmore Catholic College), Nathaniel Stafford (Wesley College), Reece Annapu (Lakelands Senior High School), Riki Wylie (Christ Church Grammar School), Toso Pa (Belmont City College), Walker Smith (Eaton Community College), Winiata Cherrington (Aranmore Catholic College), Zachary Barrett (John XXIII College)

Coding ‘dojos’ helping Perth students with autism develop new skills

The challenges kids with autism face during COVID-19Model, author and mother Chloe Maxwell says parents of autistic children are facing a new wave of challenges during the COVID-19 crisisPerth coding programs are aiming to help students with autism develop training and career skills.Ashdale Secondary College, Curtin University, Bankwest, CoderDojo WA and the Autism Academy for Software Quality Assurance teamed up to launch AASQA CoderDojo North on March 27.The coding club, or...

The challenges kids with autism face during COVID-19

Model, author and mother Chloe Maxwell says parents of autistic children are facing a new wave of challenges during the COVID-19 crisis

Perth coding programs are aiming to help students with autism develop training and career skills.

Ashdale Secondary College, Curtin University, Bankwest, CoderDojo WA and the Autism Academy for Software Quality Assurance teamed up to launch AASQA CoderDojo North on March 27.

The coding club, or dojo, aims to motivate young ‘ninjas’ aged seven to 17 to be technology creators as well as consumers.

The Darch-based dojo will be dedicated to helping students with autism build their strengths for future training and employment opportunities.

There are another three coding clubs in Bentley, Kalgoorlie and Mandurah.

“Unique abilities common in youth on the autism spectrum put them ahead of the pack when it comes to jobs in software development, internet-of-things, robotics and cybersecurity,” AASQA founder and director Professor Tele Tan said.

“It is fantastic to have the industry work with us to harness these potentials for a win-win outcome.”

Ashdale Secondary College principal Kylie Bottcher said the school was proud to work with CoderDojo WA to provide opportunities for students with autism to be part of the initiative.

CoderDojo North champion Lainey Bradley’s son attends the school and has autism.

“My son has been a part of CoderDojo since July 2017 and has excelled in his IT and coding skills,” she said.

“He knows what career path he would like to take and to have the support of Ashdale SC, Professor Tan and Dr (David) Cook, I know that he will realise his dream job.

“At long last we, as parents, have hope for the future of our loved ones leaving school and going out into the community armed with all the skills to be a success.”

The Ashdale initiative has 14 ninjas with the goal to grow to 25 ninjas this year, and mentors from Edith Cowan University and Curtin University volunteer to help students.

Ahead of World Autism Day on April 2, a Curtin University study found free coding clubs were helping adolescents build valuable life skills.

Liam Picen, 21, from Dianella, used to be a member of Curtin University’s Coding Club. Now he’s working as a computer software tester and enjoys volunteering at the club every week.

His mum, Tanya, said the AASQA CoderDojo had been so much more than just a coding club for Liam.

“The hackathons and work experiences that he was able to do through being involved with the group enabled him to realise that computing was more than game-making and programming and helped him to choose a career pathway,” she said.

“The International Software Testing Qualifications Board (ISTQB) Certificate that he achieved with the club assisted him to gain alternative pathway entrance to university and to secure an internship, which has led to a career in software testing.

“CoderDojo has helped him to be successful and he and his coding club friends now enjoy “giving back” by mentoring at the club each week.

“Liam is a proud role model and inspiration for the ninjas and is giving many CoderDojo parents hope that their child will also have opportunities for similar success.”

AASQA ambassadors Kerry Sanderson and Lyn Beazley attended the launch with Prof Tan, Dr Cook, Landsdale MLA Margaret Quirk and ECU Vice Chancellor Professor Arshad Omari.

CoderDojo WA is part of a worldwide movement of free, volunteer-led, community-based computer programming clubs for young people.

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